Gallery

1960s Social Butterflies

During the 60’s a lot of surfers social activity was club based. Board Clubs ran intra and inter club surf competitions and organised fund raising cabarets for club members and the public.

Other activities included inter club footy matches, beach rugby, prawning nights on the Swan River, watching Miss West Coast beach beauty contests and attending surf movies at the Regal Theatre in Subiaco.

They also enjoyed weekends away at Rotto, Mandurah and down south.

Promoters ran stomps for the masses. Perth band Johnny Young and The Strangers used to play to packed houses at the Broadway Stomp in Nedlands. Popular surfer based bands The Banned and The Young Blaydes attracted big surfing audiences.

This a collection of images showing WA surfers socialising in the 60s

 

Photo: 1961 travelling WA boys enjoying Xmas Day keg with NSW crew at Queenscliff NSW. Brian Cole pic.

Revellers include surfing legends Bernie Huddle (dec’d), Bob Pike (dec’d), Joe Larkins (dec’d) and others.

Photo: 1962 surfers on Rottnest Island for the Australia Day weekend. Photo credit Len Dibben.

L-R. Brian Webster, Len Dibben, Graeme Booth, Rick Skelton, Jeff Dalziel, Ron Allen, Bob Birch, Harold Gregory in front sitting Girl unknown & Dave Aylett.

Photo: 1964 City Beach crew at a Cabaret/Stomp (location unknown). Photo courtesy of Ron Moss.

L-R Graeme Ward, Sandra Keen & Sue Killen.

1964 Graeme Ward Sandra Keen Sue Killen @ stomp R Moss pic

Photo: 1965 popular Perth band Peter Dyson and ‘The Banned’. Peter Dyson pic.

Lead singer Dyso on microphone second from the right.

 

Photos: 1966 Surfers Inc Cabaret. Photos courtesy of Gayle Franks.

Revellers include Gayle Franks, Val Williams and Charley, others unidentified.

1966 Surfers Inc cabaret collage_photocat

Photo: 1966 girls camping weekend at Mandurah. Robyn Mac pic

In the centre is Robyn Mac (Peter Mac’s sister) with her arm in the air.

Photo: 1967 Cabaret at Hackett Hall, Floreat. Photo courtesy Kevin O’Dwyer.

L-R Peter Collett, Kevin O’Dwyer (dec’d), Cathy James and Ian Craigie (dec’d).

1967 Cabaret at Hackett Hall.Peter Collett,Kev O'Dwyer, Cathy James, Ian Craigie

 

Photos: Other social activities.

Left: 1967 Gayle Franks and Timon ‘Tiny’ Mc Kay doing the ‘Tiny two step’ at City Beach board club prawning night on the Swan River. Gayle Franks pic.

Right: 1960s Cottesloe surfers Sue Ellen, Jeanne Abbott, Stephanie Myer and Tina Daly at the Endless Summer surf movie at Regal Theatre in Subiaco. Media pic.

Jim King (City Beach Surf Riders Club) – In the late 60s the City Beach Surfriders Club ran successful surf cabarets to boost the Club’s coffers. Club President and media personality Trevor Burslem promoted the shows on radio station 6PR and former State boxer Ron Hutton of Cottesloe provided security on the door. I remember a big show at the Cottesloe Surf Club with popular Perth band Ross & the Little Wheels playing to a packed house.

In the end, increasing costs of bands, venue and security put an end to this caper. It got to a point where we needed 300 people to break even…game over!

Gas Works Surf Shop in Subiaco was run by the late Trevor Burslem. Bruce King was a retail manager at the shop. Gasworks business cards were used as pass outs at Spectrum Nightclub in Perth.

Image: 1968 Cabaret pass out at Spectrum Nightclub in Perth. Image courtesy of Bruce King.

Photo: Late 1960s Fancy dress cabaret at Embassy ball Room. Peter Dyson pic.

L-R Cottesloe surfers Jeff Hanson, Don McDonald, Peter Dyson, Hume Heatley and Dave Condon.

 

Errol Considine (North Coast Board Club) – In 1969 my brother Jeff had the brain wave of a ‘Bonnie & Clyde’ stomp/dance (the movie was huge then with title song big on the hit parade world-wide) ….he designed and made the posters and we plastered Perth beaches with them….hired an old hall under the Perry Lakes stadium & got a liquor licence….HUGE mob dressed up and turned up, it was great fun and the Club made THOU$AND$. Greg Wynne’s band “The Young Blaydes’ played at the Bonnie & Clyde stomp/dance.

Image: 1960s the Young Blaydes band at the Top of the Town night club in Perth. Music magazine image courtesy of vocalist Dave Aylett.

L-R Michael Byrom, Dave Aylett, Greg Wynne & Terry Malone

Photo: 1969 surf cabaret at Scarborough. Ian ‘Prive’ Morris pic.

L-R. Unidentified girl, Bobby Burns, Darryl Henry, unidentified girl, John Henry and Prive with Pam Bedford on far right.

Photo: 1969 surfing/social weekend at Rotto. Robyn Mac pic.

Bruce King doing a wheel stand on push bike with Peter Mac enjoying a jug of beer on the lawn at the Quokka Arms pub.

In the late 60s WA surfers Peter’ Spook’ Bothwell and Hume Heatley (and others) travelled to South Australia to hone their surfing & social skills.

Photo: Late 1960s Spook and Hume (on left) with South Australian Baz Young (centre) enjoying cigars at a Roaders Board Club Cabaret held at Arkaba Hotel, Fullarton South Australia. Baz Young pic.

Coming soon 1970s Social Butterflies.

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Gallery

‘The Dazzling Young Riders’ Photo Exhibition – Greg Woodward images #2 Cottesloe Beach

Greg Woodward was a WA surf photographer and writer from 1966 to 1974.

He photographed in Perth, Mandurah and Cape Naturaliste and contributed photos and articles to the then brand new OZ surf magazine called ‘Surf International’.

Click on this link to view Greg Woodward surf photographer profile published 26 April 2017.

In May this year, Greg held an exhibition of his beach life photos. The exhibition titled ‘The Dazzling Young Riders’ was held at Nyisztor Studios, 391 Canning Highway Melville/Palmyra from 6-21 May 2017.

There were approximately 80 images in the exhibition, about a third of which were guys surfing. The rest were beaches, waves, bikinis, sunbathers and a few portraits.

Greg has kindly allowed Surfing Down South to display some of his 1960-70s photos.

This is the second instalment of images from Greg’s exhibition.

 

1966-76 Cottesloe Beach images by Greg Woodward.

 

Photo #1. 1966 Ian Cairns (Southern Surf Riders Board Club) competing in a surfing contest at The Isolated, Cottesloe.

 

Photo #2. 1966 Ian Cairns competing in a surfing contest at The Isolated, Cottesloe.

 

Photos #3. 1966 Unidentified surfer at The Isolated, Cottesloe.

 

Photo #4. 1967 Cottesloe surfer Eleanor Proud (dec’d) modelling for Greg Woodward article in Surf International magazine.

 

Photo #5. 1968 Craig Bettenay (City Beach Board Club) surfing on a modified coolite at Cottesloe.

 

Photo #6. 1972 Body Surfer at Cottesloe.

 

Photo #7. 1973 The Pylon at Cottesloe Beach.

 

Photo #8. 1973 crowd at Cottesloe Beach.

 

Photo #9. 1973 strolling on the promenade at Cottesloe Beach.

 

Photo #10. 1974 Sunbaking at Cottesloe Beach.

 

Photo #11. 1974 Cottesloe pavilion and beach.

 

Photo #12. 1974 Cottesloe Beach frolic

 

Photo #13. 1974 picnic on Cottesloe Beach.

 

Photo #14. 1974 High heels on Cottesloe Beach.

 

Photo #15. 1974 no surf day at Cottesloe Beach.

 

Photo #16. 1974 picket fence at Cottesloe.

 

Photo #17. 1974 Cottesloe pavilion.

 

Photo #18. 1976 Windsor outdoor cinema at Nedlands.

 

Photo #19. 1972 coming storm at Cottesloe.

 

Greg is now retired and lives with his wife Anne in Perth.

Click on this link to view The Dazzling Young Riders’ Photo Exhibition – Greg Woodward images #1 Scarborough Beach 

Coming soon ‘The Dazzling Young Riders’ Photo Exhibition – Greg Woodward images #3 Trigg Beach.

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Gallery

1964 East Coast surf trip by Ernie Potter

In 1964 a large contingent of WA surfers headed to the East Coast of OZ to watch the first World Surfboard Championship and surf it’s fabled right hand point waves.

It worked out well, Australia’s Midget Farrelly won the inaugural World Surfboard Championship held at Manly and the WA representatives Alex Kochanowitsch and Barry King got as far as semis in the Australian Surfboard Championships.

Image: 1964 Surfboard Title to Farrelly article with results. Image courtesy of WA Newspapers.

City Beach surfers Ernie Potter, Charlie Roper and Peter Davis drove over the Nullarbor to NSW after the surfboard championships.

They joined up with Terry Jacks, Peter Docherty, Brian Cole, Jim Keenan, Cliff Hills, Keith Campbell, Dave Aylett and a pod of other WA surfers who had made the trip.

The WA boys had a great time socialising and surfing east coast waves from NSW to Queensland.

These are Ernie Potter’s holiday photos from the ’64 East Coast surf trip.

Ernie- Murray Gill, the guy sitting to my left in the following photo went on to become a very well-known and successful WA artist. A few years, ago after a long battle with the city council, he opened “Juanita’s Bar” one of Perth’s first “small” bars on Rokeby Road in Subiaco. It’s been a runaway success. Could go on a lot more about this. Google him. He’s a very interesting guy.

Photo: 1964 Sydney pub. Ernie Potter pic.

L-R Ernie Potter, Murray Gill, Percy Davis, Rob McFeat, John Moore and Sue Marriot.

Photo: 1964 L-R front row Percy Davis, Charlie Roper, Sue Shinkle, unknown, Ernie Potter and unknown at Chatswood Hotel in NSW. Ernie Potter pic.

Peter (Percy) DavisGreat memories of City Beach days and living in Tasman Street, Dee Why with Ernie, Charlie, Keith Campbell and a heap of guys from NSW. Thanks for the ride.

Photo: 1964 Percy Davis on Halvorson Boat Hawkesbury River NSW. Ernie Potter pic.

Photo: 1964 Dee Why Point NSW. Ernie Potter pic.

Photo: 1964 Terry Jacks, Ernie Potter and Peter Docherty with Terry’s Holden panel van at Byron Bay NSW. Ernie Potter pic.

Photos: 1964 Clark’s beach at Byron Bay NSW. Ernie Potter pics.

Left: The boy’s shack on beach.

Right: view of headland at Byron Bay.

Photo: 1964 Peter Docherty playing his guitar at Byron Bay NSW. Ernie Potter.

Photos: 1964 beaches at Byron Bay. Ernie Potter pics.

Left: Terry Jacks with his Malibu board.

Right: unidentified surfer at ‘The Pass’ surf break.

Ernie – The photo on the right shows Terry Jacks with a young lady, who is in fact his sister Jan. Jan and a friend (Dorothy Tolson) were both members of the City of Perth surf lifesaving club along with a lot of guys who made up a large percentage of WA’s early surfers. Jan and Dorothy went on a working holiday to, I think, Dunk Island. We caught up with them while at Byron Bay. A couple of months later we caught up again and the four of us made the drive back to Perth.

Photo: 1964 Cape Byron NSW. Ernie Potter pics.

Left: Terry Jacks with resident goat.

Right: Terry Jacks with his sister Jan.

Ernie – Keith Paul was a very good surfer from Queensland and went on to become Australian Open Mens Surf Champion in 1968. If you look at the dark fin on the board above Terry’s head in the following photo, there is a decal that was given to all who attended the meeting in 1964 at the old Ozone Hotel on Adelaide Terrace where the WA Surf riders association was formed. The decal was for use on boards, car windows etc. I still had mine unused in pristine condition which I gave to Mark Lane at Surfing WA in 2004 for their archives. (It may wind up in a surfing museum someday). How do you manage to keep stuff like that for so long???

Photos: 1964 Northern NSW. Ernie Potter pics.

Left: Terry Jacks, Peter Docherty and Keith Paul (QLD) with Terry’s panel van at Brunswick NSW.

Right: Peter Docherty humping into northern NSW town all set to hitchhike back to Dee Why.

Ernie – In late 1963 or early 1964, I bought a .22 rifle off Brian Cole. When Charlie Roper, Peter Davis and myself took off for the East I took it along. (Charlie also had his .22). Getting a gun back then was like buying an ice cream over the counter. Anyway, when Terry Jacks and I were up in Queensland, some rotten bludger broke into Terry’s panel van and amongst other things stole my wallet leaving me in dire financial straits. They didn’t find the rifle and I sold it to Keith Paul (I think for 5 quid) to relieve the pressure a bit. Shortly after we left Queensland and returned to WA.

Photo: 1964 Hire surf cats at Kirra Qsld. Ernie Potter pic.

Ernie – Looking back they were great times and a lot of humour.

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Gallery

‘The Dazzling Young Riders’ Photo Exhibition – Greg Woodward images #1 Scarborough Beach

Greg Woodward was a WA surf photographer and writer from 1966 to 1974.

He photographed in Perth, Mandurah and Cape Naturaliste and contributed photos and articles to the then brand new OZ surf magazine called ‘Surf International’.

In May this year, Greg held an exhibition of his beach life photos. The exhibition titled ‘The Dazzling Young Riders’ was held at Nyisztor Studios, 391 Canning Highway Melville/Palmyra from 6-21 May 2017.

There were approximately 80 images in the exhibition, about a third of which were guys surfing. The rest were beaches, waves, bikinis, sunbathers and a few portraits.

Greg has kindly allowed Surfing Down South to display some of his 60-70s photos.

This is the first instalment of images from Greg’s exhibition.

Click on this link to view Greg Woodward surf photographer published 26 April 2017.

Part 1. 2017 The Dazzling Young Riders’ Exhibition images. Images courtesy of Greg Woodward.

Image #1 Invite to ‘The Dazzling Young Riders’ Exhibition.

 

Image #2 Greg’s Exhibition installation at Nyisztor Studios Melville.

 

Image #3 Greg’s Exhibition installation at Nyisztor Studios Melville.

 

Image #4 Greg’s Exhibition installation at Nyisztor Studios Melville.

 

Image #5 Photographer Greg Woodward studying the Exhibition catalogue in front of a close-up Greg Laurenson photo.

 

Part 2. 1966-74 Scarborough Beach images by Greg Woodward.

Greg “Igor” Woody’s comments on Scarborough Beach over the years – Scarborough Beach (SB) has always been a magical place for Perth beach people. It’s a good spot for the wishing well that used to grace the Promenade. When you got there things could happen differently and better than they did in the burbs.

SB wasn’t always as accessible as it is now, I remember my Grandma telling me how the track in used to be covered by wooden railway sleepers to stop punters getting bogged.

In the 1940s, Mum, bless her, and her two sisters Nita and Joy and boyfriends were regular sunbathers at SB in their new beach outfits fresh from the Women’s Weekly magazine. No not the guys!

Then in the 1950s it was the infamous “Snake Pit” where the Bodgies and Widgies practised the then revolutionary JIVE dance to the sounds of Bill Hayley and the Comets. Shock, horror – Libido of the people let loose!!

What next – well then pan across to the Scarborough pub and many happy hours sinking the odd Swan lager by many SB locals, both Surfer and Surf Lifesaver and then a short stroll across the car park to the Scarborough Surf Life Saving Club to varnish a boat or two for the next big swell and inevitable rescue of the innocents.

Then in the sixties when I discovered SB, there was still a great wave because of the sandbars. The wave broke and peeled and then re-formed into a second wave that was great for the learners. With a light offshore easterly it was just heaven.  Sparkling, hollowly rolling and transparently green.

Then after hours in the briny, back to the Promenade for a fabulous burger made by Tony and featuring a serious meat pattie with crunchy Polish pickles–held together by 2 slices of three quarter inch thick toasted white bread and wrapped hastily in some sort of translucent paper that only burger makers know about and can wrap.

Before Dad [Bob] gave me the Austin A-40, I used to catch 2 x buses to get to SB and pick up my 10 foot 2 inch Len Dibben space ship from under the house of a friendly local friend of grandma’s.

It was a magical thing – coming over the hill, board under arm to a sparkling new world or a bummer sea breeze ocean. From the top car park you could see all the way down to Trigg Point.  Miles of white sand beach and sea mist with the Ocean God swirling into the white clouds high above the horizon.

Won’t dwell too much on the Servo World that’s sprung up along the beach like mushrooms.

Gone is the beautiful surf

Gone is the wishing well

Gone is the Beach

Gone the pub

Gone the burgers – along with my youth.   Say La Vee”.

 

Photo #1.1966 Greg’s Austin A40 sedan and Malibu surfboard in the car park at Scarborough Beach.

 

Photo #2. 1966 Martin Taylor (Kon-Tiki Board Club) surfing Scarborough Beach.

 

Photo #3.1966 wishing well at Scarborough Beach.

 

Photo #4 circa 1966 wave line-up and SLSC tower at Scarborough Beach.

 

Photo #5. 1967 Brian Hood (North Coast Board Club) surfing Scarborough.

 

Photo #6. 1968 Brian Hood surfing Scarborough.

 

Photo #7. 1968 Jim King (City Beach Board Club) surfing Contacio surf break at Scarborough.

Photo #8. 1968 Steve Cockburn (Sand-n-Sea Board Club) surfing Contacio surf break at Scarborough.

 

Photo #9. 1968 Steve Cockburn surfing Contacio surf break at Scarborough.

 

Photo #10. 1968 unidentified surfer Contacio surf break at Scarborough.

 

Photo #11. 1974 Swimmers at Scarborough Beach.

 

Photo #12. 1974 Young foamie surfer at Scarborough Beach.

 

Photo #13. Circa 1974 Fun in the Sun at Scarborough Beach.

 

Photo #14. 1970 Beach front scene at Scarborough.

 

Photo #15. Circa 1974 Gone are the Burgers at Scarborough.

 

Greg is now retired and lives with his wife Anne in Perth.

Coming soon ‘The Dazzling Young Riders’ Photo Exhibition – Greg Woodward images #2 Cottesloe.

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Gallery

Pantsman memories by Tom Blaxell

Former WA Surfboard manufacturer Tom Blaxell recalls Greg ‘Pantsman’ Laurenson.

I first met ‘Pantsman’ in 1966. It was at Cordingley Surfboards in Hay Street Subi, where Colin Cordingley had just given me a job for the summer school holidays as a board repairer.

I had made my own first board in the garage at home in ‘64 when I was age 14, and had been instantly hooked on surfing. I also had this creative side and loved making things as well.

Seeing my enthusiasm for surfing, my Dad bought me a book by Midget Farrelly called “This Surfing Life” which had this underlying theme of submersing your life in surfing and I swallowed it hook line and sinker.

In those days there was no such thing as professional surfing, so the only way to make a living out of surfing was to get involved in making the equipment.

Ding fixing has always been the starting point in a surfboard making career, and sure enough it is the best way to hone your skills initially, on a miniature but broad range scale. Repairing a board actually involves small amounts of shaping, graphics, glassing, sanding and finishing – all the major skills in making a board.

So there I was on the threshold, on $20 a week and blessed by being amongst a fine team of experienced craftsmen who were at the height of their game.

Colin Cordingley was the nicest guy you could come across and was the front man for the shop, along with his wife Jenny, who had this knack of somehow making me feel like I was her little favourite.

Colin’s brother Rex was the main task master and head shaper. He could get a little grumpy at times but every team needs somebody to keep the show rolling, and he always kept his sense of humour.

Photo: 1970 Colin and Rex Cordingley with Bill Oddy at Australia Day contest presentations at Yallingup. Ric Chan pic.

Kathleen King and David Moss are among the spectators’ bottom left.

Charlie Campbell was the ultimate glasser who toiled like clockwork, ever dependable, never making a fuss and a great working companion.

Photos: 1970s Charles Campbell – Cordingley glasser images. Norm Bateman pics.

Left: 1970s Charles at Cordingley Surfboards Subi.

Right: 1975 Charles skate boarding at Carine.

Dave Ellis was a more colourful character with a certain artistic flavour to his way of thinking. He did the graphics, glossing and most of the sanding. He guarded his gloss room like Fort Knox and used to do a lot of the glossing in the cool of night. He also did some repairs and was the one who gave me most of the guidance in my work.

Photos: 1970s Dave Ellis – Cordingley finisher images.

Left: 1970s Dave at Cordingley Surfboards Subi. Norm Bateman pic.

Right: 1979 Dave at Cordingley Surfboards Jolimont. Ric Chan pic.

Then there was Pantsman, the rising star shaper. The thing that struck me about him most was his totally engaging way of communication. What with big wide eyes, full of interest, his insightful thoughts and questions, delivered with such eloquence and spiced with humour amongst the foam dust. It always required a considered response, so that the briefest exchange, even if it was just a joke, left you with the feeling that it was something important and it stuck in your mind. He could become spell binding, and always made you feel good when you had a chat.

Photos: 1970s Pantsman images

Left: 1970s Pants in Cordingley Surfboards Advt which appeared in West Coast Surfer magazine.

Right: 1970 Pants with GL Surfboard and mates at Yallingup. Ric Chan pic.

For some unknown reason he dubbed me “ Tonneau “ and always opened up with it whenever we ran into each other, and I would be compelled to respond “ Pantsman”, a silly little thing that I always cherished.

Of course in those days, as a punter you got to talk to the shaper, and even get to watch him shape your board. Greg’s gift for communication stood him well in that arena, and of course also later as a contest commentator.

At the same time Pants was of course an extremely talented craftsman who set himself very high standards. In those early days at Cords he was fairly new on the scene but I could see him rapidly developing a growing following, which was encouraging for an even younger bloke like me.

At the end of summer it was back to school, but a lot of my mates wanted me to make boards for them which I did in my spare time in the garage. When I finished school that year I had decided that I wouldn’t go on to Uni but instead devote my life to surfing, so it was back to Cords again.

By the end of that summer the demand in the garage had grown to mates of mates, and it had got to the point where I had 20 boards on order. That gave me enough courage to make the decision to go into business myself at the age of 17. Col took the news pretty well but pleaded with me to stay on until Easter as things were pretty busy, so I agreed to stay on before setting up shop in Ossie Park.

Photos: 1970s Tom Blaxell images.

Left: 1971 Tom at Blaxell Surfboards factory in Osborne Park. Ric Chan pic.

Right: 1973 Tom with full mop top at Gobbles Night Club. Tom pic.

Later on Pantsman did the same, setting up just down the road from me. There was no bad blood, and to me it seemed like a natural progression for him as well. We always had a special connection from the days back at Hay Street.

There was one notable incident when he was shaping a board but made a mistake, and in a Van Gogh perfectionist reaction punched a hole in the wall and broke his arm! He couldn’t shape for some months after, which probably didn’t help business very much.

Another moment was one year at the Margaret River Masters. We had organised a low key sundowner at the point on a Saturday night with a local band from town to entertain the troops. However at the end of the show I had come to the realisation that we didn’t have any cash on hand to pay the band.  So I was discretely making myself scare behind a banner to save the embarrassment, when up pops Pantsman “Tonneau, what are you up to? “  When I explained my predicament he instantly responded by opening up his jacket to reveal 2 bottles of vino to say “Well I’ve got a couple of orphans that I’ve adopted. They were looking for a good home. Why don’t you come back with me to keep em company? “… Band? What band?

Cheers,

Tom Blaxell

Click on this link to view Greg Laurenson – Master Shaper by Errol Considine published 2 August 2017.

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