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Busso Night Life in the 60s, 70s and 80s

This is a collection of Busselton Night Life memories from some South West residents.

Night out on the town by Kevin Merifield

Kevin Merifield is a former Subiaco League Footballer and has been surfing down south since the late 50s.

For the first couple of years the South West locals, primarily dairy farmers couldn’t work out who these weird bods were invading their territory, trespassing on their land and going out in what they considered wild seas and shark invested waters. Even back in those days we dressed, acted and spoke differently (surf speak had already began).

Sometimes on a Saturday we would head into Busselton for a night out on the town.

It usually took about a half an hour at the Vasse or Commercial hotels before it would be on. The locals would have a go at us and it would be good old fashion one on one fisticuffs for about 5 minutes until you were both buggered then up to the bar to share a beer together. After a while the locals got to know us better and we became good mates with some and were eventually accepted into the community.

Photos: Busselton Hotels courtesy City of Busselton Municipal Heritage Inventory (2013)

Left: Vasse Hotel since 1906.

Right: Commercial Hotel built circa 1890

Kevin is retired and lives at Yallingup with his wife Margaret.

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Busso Picture Theatre by Ian Wiese

Ian Wiese grew up in Busselton in the 50s & 60s.

Back then Busselton had a population of about 6,500 ie smaller than Dunsborough is today! It had 2 seasons – summer and winter.

Photo: 1951 Mrs Wiese with her twin sons Stan and Ian on Busselton Beach. Ian Wiese pic.

In the winter we were at school, played sport (in my case hockey), and for entertainment we went to the picture theatre in Busselton or when we were older the drive-in. 

At the picture theatre anyone caught cuddling up to their girlfriend were moved by the owner’s wife who used to patrol the theatre with a torch watching out for any signs of misbehaviour. (Just as well she didn’t get out to the drive-in where all the action was).

After the pictures there was House’s milk bar just around the corner in Queen Street, or the Jolly Roger cafe down the other end near the Vasse hotel. Not a lot else went on in Busselton apart from the pubs. We often used to hold parties at our place after hockey.  

Photo: 1966 Some of Ian’s hockey team at his family home in Morrison St in Busselton. Ian Wiese pic.

The people in the photo (left to right) are Rob Ainsworth, Stan Wiese (in the car), Jim Watts, Ian Wiese, and Fred Ball. The lads are leaning on a 1955 Morris Oxford, jointly owned by Ian and his twin brother.

“Hooning” was a popular past time – the timber yards between the tennis club and the railway jetty were a good place as there was a lot of gravel. Talking to some at a recent reunion I learnt how fast you could go through the S bend over the old bridge at the entrance to Dunsborough, and other hair raising tales. I recall stories about some prominent citizens of the town setting records in their Jaguars for the Bunbury-Busselton trip (which didn’t involve slowing down for the bridge at Capel). With the drinking age at 21, it was common for bored youths to get a keg and take it somewhere into the bush on a Saturday night. There were some terrible accidents as they drove home. In those days Western Australia had a population of 500,000 and a road toll of 350. We tell ourselves we were safe but actually we were the survivors – poor car design, unsafe roads, and alcohol took a terrible toll. 

In summer there was a lot more going-on. People came down for holidays, surfers came down. There were stomps at Churchill Park (until the council banned the Stomp), the Tennis club, Yallingup Hall, Cowaramup Hall, Witchcliffe Hall and the rowing club in Bunbury. Winter relationships broke up as the girls chased the visiting surfers and the boys chased the farmer’s daughters on holiday. At a recent reunion a member of a 60’s band that played at these venues recalled that they used to come home high after playing at the Yallingup Hall!

I left Busselton for Perth early in 1967 when I was only just 17, so I missed the Busselton pub scene apart from one brief summer.

Ian is a keen photographer and now lives in Dunsborough with his wife Glenys.

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Jetty drinks with George Simpson

George Simpson formerly of Cottesloe has lived and surfed in the South West since the late 60s.

We’d come down on weekends and we’d want to go find girls. We’d find the girls at the fish and chip shop next to Busselton Jetty. We’d also go to the youth hostel, but there were too many cops around there. So we’d go and get the oldest one of us to get a couple of bottles of beer and we’d sit on the end of the jetty. We got to know the local girls and they would come hang out there too.

Image: 1960s Busselton jetty with Queens Street in the background. Image courtesy of vintage Tourist post card.

Sally Gunter, the lighthouse keeper’s daughter, came around the bend with Chrissy Brennon on skateboards while I was driving up the Cape one day. I introduced a couple of the lads to their future wives. They were cool chicks. They were the sort of girls who were more inclined to like surfers than bogs. (Extract from Surfing Down South book).

George works in the Prawn Fishing industry and lives at Yallingup.

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Busso Stomps by Sally Gunter

Sally Gunter is the daughter of a former Cape Naturaliste Lighthouse keeper and is a real South West local.

My five girlfriends and I used to attend Stomps held in a hall near the Busselton jetty on a Friday night. At about 10pm surfers from the city would turn up at the Stomp….much to the displeasure of local lads. I remember meeting Gary Greirson and other city surfers there.

My Busso friend Pat Milner met & married Ian Cairns in Busselton. That changed her life forever!

Images: 1975 Ian Cairns and Pat Cairns (nee Milner). Images courtesy of WA Newspapers and Ric Chan.

Left: Ian Cairns with his big wave board made for the World Surfing Championships held in Hawaii in 76. Ian designed and shaped the 3.1m board at Gary Greirson’s Surfboard factory in Osborne Park.

Right: Oceans Surf Comp at Trigg Point. L-R Pat Cairns, Barry Day, Ian Cairns, Russell Catto & unidentified.

At the time I was going out with Rick Lobe. I worked in the Dunsborough Bakery and Rick worked with my father at the Cape Naturaliste lighthouse.

I remember we made a trip up to the city with Gary Greirson in his Kombi. Gary was going through a religious phase and went on non-stop about religion the whole trip.

Photo: 1975 Sally Gunter & Rick Lobe at Dunsborough with Gremmo’s dog ‘Horse’. Peter Mac pic.

Sally is married to SW surfing legend Andy Jones and lives at Yallingup.

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Busso Dances by Steve ‘Horny’ Campbell

On weekends my mates and I used to go to dances held at the Busselton Tennis Club. That’s where we met Sally Gunter and the other Busso girls. Trevor ‘TA’ Anderson met his future wife Linda Dodd at those dances. Linda’s parents ran the beach shop near the jetty.

Back then the Busso Bogs thought we were trying to steal their girls and there were confrontations. Now I’m friends with some of those Bogs and they are really nice guys…..they could tell you some stories!

Horny has sold his Electrical Business and lives at Yallingup.

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Vasse-A-Go-Go by Bruce King

Bruce King formerly of Subiaco spent a large part of his youth surfing and socialising down south in the late 60s to early 70s.

We used to drive down south on a Friday night and meet up with Busso girls Linda Dodd, Wendy, Gail Colombera and maybe Shaz Day at the Jetty Tea Rooms. Linda Dodd’s parents owned the Tea Rooms which sold fish & chips and meals.

At other times we went to stomps at the Vasse Hall. We called it Vasse-a-Go-Go. One night the old bloke that run the show stopped the music because someone had broken the toilet seat and he wouldn’t continue until someone owned up…can’t remember anyone owning up! The Busso bogs also visited Vasse-a-Go-Go and one big bog turned his glass upside down on our table, which meant he wanted to fight one or all of us….without George Simpson being there, we declined his offer!

Photo: Vasse Hall built circa 1898. Courtesy City of Busselton Municipal Heritage Inventory (2013)

We also frequented the Ship Hotel. Norm Bateman used to do a comedy routine there. One night instead of kicking us out, the management locked us in and called the cops.

Photo: The Ship Hotel built circa 1898. Courtesy City of Busselton Municipal Heritage Inventory (2013)

One New Year Eve’s we broke into the Community Hall in Busso for a quiet drink and we were busted by the cops. We got off because one of the Bussell girls was there with us.

Bruce is retired and lives in Dunsborough with his wife Anne.

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In the early 80s big name OZ bands played with late licences at the Commercial Hotel in Busso. This entertainment was popular with SW surfers.

Loz Smith (Quindalup) – I remember listening to Western Flyer with Matt Taylor, Stevie Wright and Brian Cadd at the Commercial in Busso.  

Jo Felton (Dunsborough)After the Dunsy pub closed lots of us used go to the Commercial in Busso, when it stayed open late at one stage. I remember seeing some bands there, but don’t remember names now. Most of the Dunsy and Yalls crew did the same drive when the night club thing was happening in Busso….it was a bit of a novelty back in the days when the pubs shut at 10 pm hahahaha.

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Refer to Surfing Down South book published 2014 for more ‘Hanging with the Locals’ stories.

 

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Historic Seymour family cottages in Dunsborough

Historical notes on the Seymour family cottages in Dunsborough

The Seymour family were early settlers in the Capes region. William Seymour arrived in Dunsborough 1845-1846 to work for Lionel Sampson and the ‘Castle Rock Whaling Company.’ The Seymour’s two original family dwellings designed in local vernacular style were located on Lots 1 – 17 in Dunn Bay Road, Dunsborough WA, before being relocated to Millbrook Farm at Yallingup. One of the cottages was made from stone and the other weatherboard. Source: City of Busselton Municipal Heritage Inventory 2013.

The Seymour’s family name is shown on the 1902 Lands Department map showing the Locality of the Caves between Capes Naturaliste and Leeuwin in WA.

Image: 1902 map of Capes region with the Seymour’s name in Dunsborough. Image courtesy of State Records Office of WA.

Image: Pre 1980s the Seymour’s stone cottage on Dunn Bay Rd Dunsborough. Image courtesy of the City of Busselton Municipal Heritage Inventory 2013.

Julie Favell (former SW resident): “In 1982 I took these photos of the historic Seymour cottage which used to be located at the end of Dunn Bay Road in Dunsborough just across the road from a car park and boat ramp on the beach.”

Photo: 1982 the Seymour’s weatherboard cottage on Dunn Bay Rd Dunsborough #1. Julie Favell pic.

Photo: 1982 the Seymour’s weatherboard cottage on Dunn Bay Rd Dunsborough #2. Julie Favell pic.

The Seymour’s family dwellings were relocated from Dunsborough to Kevin and Margaret Merifield’s Millbrook Farm at Yallingup in the 1980s.

Kevin Merifield: “My understanding is the Seymour cottages in Dunn Bay road were the first cottages built in Dunsborough around 1850, when Dunsborough was a whaling station.

The historic Seymour cottages were relocated to Millbrook from memory in the early 1980s, we purchased Millbrook at Yallingup in 1976.

At that time Malcolm Paine was operating a tourist business on our property at Millbrook, the Seymour cottages were about to be demolished and we decided to save them and relocate to Millbrook.

Ironically Margaret and I were intrigued when we first came across the cottages around 1958, we knocked on the door to see if we could have a look and Jack Seymour the owner obliged by showing us around and offering a cup of tea, little did we know we would become the proud owners some 25 years later”.

Photo: 2016 the Seymour’s stone cottage on Millbrook Farm at Yallingup. Kevin Merifield pic.

Photo: 2016 the Seymour’s weatherboard cottage on Millbrook Farm at Yallingup. Kevin Merifield pic.

Photo: 2016 the Seymour’s cottages on Millbrook Farm at Yallingup. Kevin Merifield pic.

Left: Stone cottage, Middle: Jack Seymour’s cottage, Right: Weatherboard cottage.

Julie Favell: “I am ever so pleased about the Seymour cottages being relocated to Kevin and Margaret Merifield’s property. It is nice to know someone took the time to preserve a beautiful piece of Dunsborough’s history.”

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Gallery

Jim McFarlane’s 1960s SW surfing recollections

Jim McFarlane lives at Yallingup and is a veteran South West surfer.

These are Jim’s recollections of surfing in the SW in the 1960s.

First SW Trip

My first trip to Yallingup was in 1963, with my father, 2 brothers and Peter Eakins (later to be a great WAFL & VFL footballer). I was 13 years old and we camped under the melaleucas in hammocks above Yallingup Beach. It was Easter and there was a range of surf craft, ranging from Malibu’s, long timber toothpicks, skis and surf boats. We headed down to Cowaramup Bay to check out the surf at South Point. Today it reminds me of a scene from the “Endless Summer’ surf movie. After walking through the bush and across the sand dunes we arrived at the point to find no surf at all, so we headed back to Yallingup to find out one of the guys had been attacked by a shark.

Editor’s noteBrian Audus age 25 was surfing on chest board at Yallingup when he was bitten on the arm by a shark. It was not fatal.

Dolphins Surfriders Club

In 1964 I joined the Dolphins Surfriders (or hairy backs). A great group of the original surfers of WA. Names like Alan Robbins, Ron Drange, Ray Geary, Ray Nelmes, Keith Smith, Ray Smith, Dave Campbell & Kevin Merifield. My first trip away on a Dolphin comp weekend was with Don Campbell & Don Glenister when I was about 16. We were picked up by Don Campbell about 8.30 pm on a filthy, stormy Friday night. I remember mum wasn’t too happy about us going down south on such a foul weekend. Three in the front of Don’s Falcon Ute. We slept in the Dolphin’s board shack built on land behind Caves House Hotel. We woke on Saturday morning to find the wind had dropped but the swell was huge. The old ‘Hairy Back’s’ decided the Farm would be good, so we checked it out and found out it was also too big. Tony Harbison was there and said Cape Piquet might be ok. We arrived to find perfect waves running off the point. “The comp was on!” The wind was freezing and the water just as cold. A fire was lit on the point and we spent most of the day surfing the best section I can remember there, to this day! The only wet suits available were clumsy dive wetsuits – usually with arms cut off, which gave you a hell of a chaff. I surfed in my father’s old West Perth jumper.

Dolphins Club Shack at Yallingup

The Dolphins were mainly contract carpenters, builders & small business men. They got together and built a shack on Yallingup Hotel land – with the Publican’s approval. It had one big room, with a kitchen at the end and a bathroom at the side. It was fitted out with triple bunks, which made it quite cosy. Because some of us were under age and couldn’t go to the bar, the oldies would sometimes bring us back a few beers. It would get quite interesting for us young ones, when the guys and their wives/girlfriends got back to the shack after closing time, all jolly & horny. Enough said!!

Photo: 1964 Dolphins Club Shack at Yallingup. Photo courtesy of Ernie Potter.

1964 Yalls Dolphins shack Caves House #2 - E potter pic

Demise of Dolphins Club Shack

The shack had to be removed from the hotel land in 1966 because the State Government had sold the hotel to a couple of local farmers, who didn’t have any time for surfers. We decided to go down, cut the shack into pieces and store behind Surfside Store, with the hope of being able to re0asemble it somewhere else, in the future. The outgoing publican of the hotel was a great bloke, he was very apologetic and plonked a 10 gallon keg in the middle of the shack for the workers. Needless to say, the shack came down pretty quick smart. That night we were invited to the hotel for a farewell dinner. It was a great night with fantastic servings of prawns, crays etc. Scarborough’s Murray Smith was serving behind the bar and the publican said we could have what we liked. Harvey Wallbangers were the go until some other guests arrived. The cops from Busselton were also invited and when they saw underage drinkers they started asking questions. The publican came out and told them we were guests and to leave us alone. And so that was what happened! The shack was never rebuilt and it is suspected that Tony Harbison used the timbers to build one of his Hideaway Holiday Homes at Yallingup – better him than the white ants!

Editor’s note: In the early 1960s Bill Copley the lessee and licencee of  Caves House Hotel, Yallingup allowed the West Coast, Yallingup and Dolphins board clubs to build club shacks on the hotel grounds. In 1966 Caves House was sold by the State Govt to the Emmett brothers and the new owners reclaimed the West Coast shack (old laundry) and wanted the other two shacks demolished to make way for paid accommodation.

Before the Dung Beetles

Early summer was hell in the SW, with bush flies breeding up to plague proportions. I remember many walks from the gravel down to Gallows when the track had become impassable to 2WD. Bags on our backs, mals on our head and towels wrapped around our face, like something out of Lawrence of Arabia, to keep the buggers away. Often we arrived at the surf, coloured black from the ilmenite sand only to find a howling onshore wind.

Kevin Merifield’s Merc

Kevin Merifield spent a lot of time surfing Gallows and Guillotine. As we sometimes walked down the track, boards on head and towels wrapped around our faces, we could hear Kevin roaring up the dirt track in his Mercedes. He seemed to be able to get up & down the track in almost any conditions.

Photo: 1968 Kevin Merifield’s Mercedes 280SE on the Gallows dirt track – Jim McFarlane pic

1968 Gallows track Kevin Merifield's Merc 280SE- J McFarlane img623

Bare Bears

I used to surf Three Bears a lot over summer – in the nude! Not only did it feel free, but not many other surfers dropped in on me!

Editor’s noteunfortunately we don’t have a photo of bare Jim surfing Bears!

Photos: (Left) 1966 party wave at Rocky Point. (Right) 1967 Jim McFarlane in boardies surfing Lighthouse near Cape Naturaliste – Jim McFarlane pics.

1966-67 Rocky Point & Lighthouse JIm McFarlane collage_photocat

Boodge Guthrie

A few locals didn’t take kindly to the influx of surfers. Boodge Guthrie was one such local. The sign on his gate of his farm on Caves Road read “No fuel, No phone, No tow”.

Harbo & the Bikies

Tony ‘Harbo’ Harbison and some of the senior surf crew had a few run-ins with bikies who would cause trouble at the Yallingup pub. After a heated discussion, Harbo told the bikes that if they were so tough they should come down to Yallingup Beach and try surfing. He offered to lend them some boards. They turned up the next morning and headed off in their jeans to attempt the waves. After floundering around for an hour, they handed back the boards and thanked Tony, shook hands and left friends.

Jim’s Surfmobiles

Photos: (Left) 1966 Ken Fletcher & Jim’s Holden panel van at Yalls. (Right) 1973 Jim’s VW 2 door station wagon on Yalls hill – Jim McFarlane pics

1966 & 73 Jim McFarlanes cars at Yalls collage_photocat

House on the Hill

Jim and his wife Margaret built a house on Yallingup hill in 1973-75.

Photos: 1973-75 construction of McFarlane residence – Jim McFarlane pics

1973-75 McFarlanes residence Yallingup Hill collage_photocat

Photo: 1983 Jim McFarlane surfing Three Bears in a wettie – Jim McFarlane pic

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Jim is retired and a regular in the surf at Yallingup.

The McFarlane’s live in their house on the hill when they are not chasing the sun around OZ & NZ.

 

 

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1950s WA Surfing History by Kevin Merifield

At 10 years of age (1948) I started riding my bike from Daglish where I lived to City Beach, that in itself was quite an experience as the then only road leading to City Beach was the old “switch back” a narrow unsealed road which literally went up and down over the sand dunes. At the beach I used to swim and catch wave’s body surfing style with arms to my sides and chest out usually in the white water straight to shore. As I got a bit older I started cutting across the face of the wave with one arm out and hand of the other arm on the face of the wave to keep me in the action area of the wave, I guess that’s where I first experienced the thrill of surfing and I just kept riding that bike back for more.

At about age 12 or 13, I joined my big brother Lyn as a junior member of the North City now Floreat Surf Lifesaving Club and then a couple of years later followed him to the Swanbourne club. Lyn was a pretty good swimmer and won a state junior R&R title in 1952, unfortunately I wasn’t much chop as a swimmer and usually brought up the rear of the field in most races, come to think of it I’m still not much chop as I usually find out when swimming after my board at Margaret’s or Yals after snapping many of Creatures leg ropes, they reckon I’m their best test pilot!

The real stuff was yet to come and at age 17 I ventured down South to Yallingup with my cousin and best mate Ray (Spider) Evans for the Australia day long week end 1955. It took us about 5 hours to get there via the South West Hwy. as there was no coast road then. I can still recall driving the little green bug (Renault) over the hill looking at Yals for the first time and saying “shit spider, have a look at that” both our eyes were popping out of our heads as the waves looked monstrous, in reality it was probably a typical Yals 5-6 foot day but by Perth standards it was huge.

To this day I still don’t know who told us about Yals, I guess the word just got around!

Some of the guys I remember heading down south in the first couple of years included the following:-

List of WA surf pioneers ex Kev Merifield IMG_0002a

Apologies for any left out.

It didn’t take long for the word to get around, so the numbers swelled significantly in subsequent years and still is today.

Photo: Early 1960s Yallingup Beach line-up. L-R Tony Burgess, Don Roper, Dave Williams, Don Bancroft, Howard Kent, Rob Birch, John Peterson, Kevin Merifield, unknown, Alan Hamer, Gary Birch, Mark Paterson, Barry King, Laurie Burke & Colin Moore. Photo courtesy of the West Australian.

1960 Yalls beach line-up West Pic IMG_01

Our home at Yalls was an ex-Navy hammock pitched between a couple of melaleuca trees in the virgin bush overlooking Yalls main break. Tucker was usually a couple of tins of baked beans, great for Jim’s blue flame fart trick or spaghetti and meat balls around the camp fire, later jaffles became the go with Horse Williams regularly knocking off a half a dozen or so a meal.

Sometimes for a real treat Red Abbott would walk out on the reef at low tide and catch a couple of octopus which he would cook in olive oil and share if there was enough to go around, it was a bit like JC feeding the multitude.

Getting into the old hammocks at night after a skin full of booze provided a challenge which often resulted in being tipped upside down with the help of a mate flat on your face in the dirt. Trying to keep warm wasn’t easy until someone got hold of a couple of  ex air force bear suits which the fighter pilots used to wear in world war 2, they were great and it wasn’t long before quite a few of us had one. When it rained, we used to head for the shelter of the veranda of the old one room Yallingup primary school on the corner of Caves Rd. and Wildwood Rd. just down the road from where I now live, or sometimes if there was an unlocked door or window head for one of the old Hammond cottages, which were the only houses on what is now the exclusive Yallingup hill.

Often in the mornings at first light we would be wakened by the sounds of the then budding trumpet player Don Bancroft a non-drinker going through the scales to the annoyance of the hung over, bleary eyed rest of the crew. After much yelling of abuse and rock throwing to no avail it was time to scramble out of the hammock and from where we were camped check out the waves. Don later became one of the leading Trad jazz trumpeters in Australia and if I’m ever in Perth on a Saturday arvo and not watching my old footy team Subi, I head down to the Railway hotel North Fremantle to see Don and his Cornerhouse Jazz Band do their stuff.

Photo: 1957-68 Subiaco Football Club. Kevin Merifield SFC 213 games & 4 State games – Photo courtesy of the Subiaco Football Club and Weekend News.

1957-68 Subiaco FC Kevin Merifield SFC 213 games & 4 State games - Weekend News IMG

When it was time to go for a surf we would venture out at Yals on whatever equipment we had. For the first couple of years that was usually a 16 foot toothpick ex lifesaving paddle board, 9-10 foot home made hollow ply board, chest board, hand board and not to be outdone Jim Keenan & Cocko’s whopping big double ski which was about 25 foot long.

For me at first it was a chest board which was probably the equivalent of today’s body board. It was about 4 foot x 18 inches marine ply with turned up nose, they were originally hired out at Scarborough beach as ‘surf shooters’ in the 1920s / 30s but later banned, being too dangerous at the popular beach. After being stored at the Scarborough surf club for many years we managed to get hold of a few which were ‘re born’ at Yals.

Photo: 1950s wooden chest board similar to the board used by Kevin. It is understood this board was made by Ward boat builders. Photo courtesy of Bob Green.

Kevin – The board built by Ward looks very familiar and similar to the one I used to use, chrome handles and all. You will notice the concave at the bottom that used to fit around our mid drift when lying on the board, we also wore flippers. Hard to see if the Ward board had turned up nose as mine certainly did. 

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Surfing in those early years was hassle free, dropping in wasn’t a problem and it was normal to see 3 or 4 guys on the same wave sometimes even holding hands. Jim and Cocko were classic to watch on their double ski as was Pato doing head stands no wonder Jake and Paul turned out so good and Davo carving up the waves in great style, he was probably the pick of the bunch at that stage. Kneel paddling was the go and for some like Pato finished up with calluses on their knees the size of tennis balls. There were no wet suits, or leg ropes just ‘budgie smugglers’ or a pair of old footy shorts and jumper which meant you spent half the time swimming after your board in the bay at Yals and if you wiped out spent time under water trying to free the footy jumper wrapped around your head.

For the first couple of years we only surfed Yalls but then started exploring other spots, they included Injidup Bay now Car Park Gallows and South Point. Getting to Injidup was a challenge as there were no roads or 4 wheel drive vehicles just a sandy fisherman’s track with plenty of limestone outcrops. You would regularly get bogged and more often than not take out a muffler or stake a tyre. About the only car that could handle the track trouble free was the old reliable VW Beetle, they would go anywhere and looked a sight with six or more 9/10 foot Mals strapped on the roof. It seems funny now but we surfed South Point for a couple of years, usually when it was onshore at Yals before someone said “hey have a look at that over there” pointing to what is now famous North Point. We also didn’t make it to Margaret’s until 1960/61.

I can’t recall exactly when, probably late fifties, Davo, Horse and myself ventured south down the beach after a surf at Gallows and spotted a few good looking  waves coming in, Davo said that looks like a cut throat wave and hence ‘Guillotine’ a now popular break was born.

There is always conjecture as to who and when the first waves were ridden at Yals and Margaret’s. At Yals the names of Ron Drage, Rod Baker & Don Morrison and Bruce Hill, Bernie Huddle & Bill Pratley come to the fore. Bill Pratley swears it was he, Moonshine & Bernie in Easter 1953 and I reckon that’s probably right. As for Marg’s the most accepted claim is that Mal Bromley and Warren McKinney were the first in either 1960 or 61, Murray Smith, Cliff Hill & other names also pop up in conversation. Harbo claims Mal & Warren came back to Caves House raving about the monster waves they discovered and surfed at Prevelly. With more than a few ales under our belts their claims were dismissed as exaggerated bullshit, “nothing could be bigger than Yals we all said. Harbo reckons he and I went down there the next day and surfed it but my memory fails me on that one.

Image: 1969 Kevin Merifield surfing Margaret River main break. Image courtesy of Sunday Times.

1969 Kevin Merifield surfing Marg River Sunday Times1

Around 1957/58 we formed the West Coast Board Riders club with meetings held in Davo’s garage in Wembley. By then, there were regular groups heading down south for weekends, this usually entailed 4/5 hour trips via South West Hwy. with the obligatory refreshment stops (pubs) along the way. By the time we hit Yals we were well and truly primed for a good days surf the next day. On the return trip home we would often stop at the Highway Hotel in Bunbury for the Sunday arvo session. With Bernie Huddle (piano), Don Bancroft (trumpet) Moonshine (clarinet) Artie Taylor (trombone) and Harbo (tea chest slap base) we had the makings of a pretty good Trad jazz band. The band and the rest of us would get free grog which made it all worthwhile. How we got back to Perth in one piece I’ll never know!

After a few years of roughing it between the melaleucas at Yals we put the hard word on Bill Copley, the then manager of Caves House hotel to take over the old laundry as our new home. After a bit of tidying up, double decker bunks, concrete floor and a roof over our heads we really had it made, and we only had to stagger about 50 metres back to the ‘Shack’ as it became known after a night at Caves. With sometimes a dozen or so crammed into the shack it was every man for himself. They were hilarious times with everyone taking the piss out of each other, it was a laugh a minute with some real characters within the group. The mateship amongst that early crew was very special and still is today.

Photo: 1962 Yallingup WCBC shack with Laurie Burke’s FB Holden & the Ghost’s Holden panel van out the front. Brian Cole pic.

1962 Yalls WCBC shack L Burke's FB Holden & Ghost's Holden panel van - Brian Cole pic img268

A couple of years later another shack was built not far from the original to house the ever increasing crew heading south, most were younger than the original crew and many too young to hold a Driver’s license hence the originals became known as the ‘big wheels’ and the younger crew the ‘little wheels’.

A collection of my anecdotes follows:-

Mixing with the locals

For the first couple of years the locals, primarily dairy farmers couldn’t work out who these weird bods were invading their territory, trespassing on their land and going out in what they considered wild seas and shark invested waters. Even back in those days we dressed, acted and spoke differently (surf speak had already began). Sometimes on a Saturday we would head into Busselton for a night out on the town. It usually took about a half an hour at the Vasse or Commercial hotels before it would be on. The locals would have a go at us and it would be good old fashion one on one fisticuffs for about 5 minutes until you were both buggered then up to the bar to share a beer together. After a while the locals got to know us better and we became good mates with some and were eventually accepted into the community.

Proto-type leg rope

Getting tired of swimming after his 16 foot toothpick at Yals Bill Pratley proclaimed enough was enough. What was probably the first attempt to attach board to body Bill tied a big hunk of rope around his waist and the other end to the handle on the tail of his 16 foot tooth pick board, the rope was pretty thick and no way was it going to snap. Bill paddled out at Yals on a reasonable size day, took off, blew it, got wiped out and consequently got dragged behind his board all the way to shore. I can still picture his head bobbing up in the white water every now and then desperately gasping for air on the journey to shore, just as well he had good lungs!

Butch Guthrie

There were times when we would be sitting out the back at Yalls when someone would yell out “lookout here comes Butch”. All eyes would turn to the sky and in the distance this little single engine plane would be heading our way. Before long Butch would swoop over us at about 10 feet above the ocean do a loop and come back for seconds. We would be crapping ourselves usually diving under as he passed over us. We got to know Butch a local farmer and real character and after we discovered Guillotine, put the hard word on him to put in a track for us from Gallows. Butch who never wore shoes had feet about 6 inches wide with soles as hard as leather, he came to have a look and literally walked through this prickly bush scrub as though it was carpet, “no worries boys” he said, went home got his bulldozer and an hour later we had our track, total cost 1 carton of beer.

Photos: 1960s Butch Guthrie with bi-planes and tractor on his Moses property. Photos courtesy of Guthrie family.

1960s Boodge Guthrie 5 collage_photocat

While there are old car bodies littered along Butch’s old dirt track to Gallows as testimony to its roughness, Kevin didn’t need a 4wd to conquer the track, he did it with ease in his Mercedes sedan.

Photo: 1968 Kevin Merifield driving his Mercedes 280SE on the Gallows track. Photo Jim McFarlane.

1968 Gallows track Kevin Merifield's Merc 280SE- J McFarlane img623

Hammond cottages

There was this time when we were in our hammocks at Yalls and it started to piss down. Jim Keenan said let’s check out one of the Hammonds cottages, so he Spider and myself headed off and managed to find one with a window unlocked, after settling in with a bed each there was this knock on the door with a female voice shouting “come on out I know your there”, there was silence and then after about the third time, Jim casually called back in a soft voice “There’s no one here”, we  pissed ourselves laughing and with tails between our legs fessed up to a not so amused Mrs. Hammond.

Photo: 1971 a Hammond Cottage on Elsegood Road Yallingup. This cottage was purchased by Peter ‘Spook’ Bothwell. Photo courtesy of Peter Bothwell.

1971 Yalls Spook's Hammond shack - Peter Bothwell IMG_0002

Bernie Huddle

Spider Evans, Jim Keenan and myself would often hitch a ride down south with Bernie Huddle in his FB Holden. Bernie who was an industrial chemist by profession wasn’t very mechanical minded, Jim sitting in the front seat without Bernie realizing would ease his leg across, put his foot on the clutch and slowly push the peddle down. With the motor revving like hell Bernie would throw his hands in the air and declare “there’s something wrong with this bloody car” Jim would suck Bernie in several times without him ever knowing what was going on, Spider and myself would be pissing ourselves in the back seat. After a couple hours of driving Bernie would be seen continuously tapping the fuel gauge and further declaring “there’s something wrong this bloody thing keeps going down”.

Photo: 1958 City of Perth SLSC members L-R Bernie Huddle, Tony Harbison, Artie Taylor, Dave Williams, Colin Taylor & Bruce’ Moonshine’ Hill. John Budge pic.

1958 City Beach B Huddle, T Harbison, A Taylor, D Williams, C taylor, Moonshine John Budge pic

Spider’s lucky break

One night at Caves House Hotel Arty Shaw lined up this barmaid and arranged for her to meet him back at the shack after she knocked off. At closing time we all staggered back to the shack and settled in for the night. About a half an hour later, I heard this little faint voice in the darkness calling “John are you there” Spider not being one to miss an opportunity responded also in a faint voice “over here” Well Spider did pretty well for himself that night and for me on the bunk above him, it was little sleep with the boat rocking and rolling all night. At daylight we heard this almighty scream and the barmaid yelling “who the hell are you”, Spider had a grin on his face from ear to ear for the rest of the week end.

Ghost rescue

One day at big howling offshore Marg’s Ghost Kent took off on this huge set wave and didn’t make the drop. Paddling back after a wave I spotted Ghost swimming to shore after his board. I paddled over to him and said “Ghost your board went back over the wave and is heading out to sea”. Ghost who wasn’t a very strong swimmer turned around and headed back after his board. After sitting back in the line-up for a while and watching what was going on I realized Ghost wasn’t making any headway as his board with the aid of the stiff offshore was drifting faster than he could swim. I decided it was rescue time and took off after his board, by the time I got to it and caught up with him we were probably a K or more off shore in the deep black water struggling like hell to make any headway. I reckon it took us a good hour or more to make it back where we both collapsed buggered on the shore, but very pleased to be back on dry land.

Photo: 1961 The Ghost surfing Gallows on a King and Cole surfboard. Photographer unknown.

1961 Ghost at Gallows on King & Cole surfboard unknown photographer 2 (2)

Serenade at Caves House

Sometimes in the arvo after a good mornings surf we would head over to Cave House for a quiet ale. Caves a State Govt. owned hotel then catered mainly for honeymoon couples. We would sit on the road next to the pub playing 78 rpm Trad Jazz vinyl records on a wind up gramophone which was our kind of music in those days. Jim Keenan’s favourite was ‘I want a gal just like the gal that married dear old dad’ it was a great rendition but after about 10 times straight it got a bit much. The honeymooners also thought so and would lean out the window telling us to shut up.

Gallows delights

When we went to Gallows for a surf pre track days we had to walk through the scrub for about a mile, board perched on our head Indian style. We would sneak past the Cullity house in the middle of the scrub and if you were lucky sometimes get a glimpse of a very attractive Cullity daughter sun baking nude in the back yard. On our way back we would collect drift wood from the sand dunes and trade it for a Devonshire Tea at Mrs. Hunt’s Tea Room on Caves Rd (now Lavender Tea House), she used to use it for dry floral art arrangements.

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These days.

These days Kevin is retired and lives on a rural property in the South West with his wife Margaret. He still surfs in the South West and enjoys surfing up north during the cold SW winter.

Photo: 1990s Kevin Merifield surfing Turtles on the North West Coast. Photographer unknown.

1990s Gnaraloo Kevin Merifield surfing Turtles IMG_0011a

70th Birthday party.

In 2008 Kevin celebrated his 70th birthday with surfing friends at his Millbrook property.

Photos: 2008 Kevin’s 70th birthday pics and bottom right 2012 Kevin & Harbo at Yalls. Photos courtesy of Kevin Merifield & Loz Smith.

2008 -12 Kevin Merifield 70th birthday & Harbo 1 collage_photocat

Biography.

Kevin has written & published his biography ‘An Interesting Life’ for friends and family…see book cover below.

2014 An Interesting Life by Kevin Merifield IMG_001

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Gallery

Terry ‘Horse’ Williams – SW surfing recollections

BACKGROUND

In the late 50s & early 60s Terry ‘Horse’ Williams was part of a group of footballers from the Subiaco Football Club (SFC) who helped pioneer surfing in the SW. Terry got his nick name as he was big and as strong as a horse.

Terry (127 games) and his SFC surfing mates Kevin ‘Legs’ Merifield (213 games), Barry Brakewell (16 games) & Ray Nelmes (15 games) spent a good portion of their youth chasing waves in the SW.

Kevin’s cousin Olympic hockey player Ray ‘Spider’ Evans (rated the best inside centre in the world) was also part of the group, he represented Australia in 3 Olympic Games.

As well as a stand-up surfer Terry was a keen body surfer and used a wooden body board & flippers.

Photo: 1958 L-R Des Gaines, Alan Hamer, Dave Williams, Bob Keenan, Ray Evans, Kevin Merifield & Terry Williams in front of surf shacks at Caves House Hotel Yallingup. Photo credit Brian Cole and Surfing Down South book..

1958 Yalls Caves House D Gaines, A Hamer, D Williams, B Keenan ,R Evans, K Merifield & T Williams B Cole IMG

These are Terry’s SW surfing recollections.

LATE 1950s

NATIONAL SERVICE

Yallingup as a surfing venue first came to my attention after I had met Dave Williams in 1957 while in Nashos at Leeuwin in the Navy. I didn’t know Dave before then, but I used to see him at City Beach. I lived in Floreat Park with my folks and City Beach was where I went for a swim after work. Trigg’s was my beach of choice.

Nashos was a great way to spend six months having a good time and getting paid for it. We used to ring up the local liquor store who would then deliver us a 5 or 10 gallon keg and place it outside the fence in such a way that we could pump it and have the spout coming through the wire. This system ensured many enjoyable evenings where Dave could expand on the thrills and delights of Yallingup surf.

FIRST TRIP TO YALLINGUP

My first trip to Yallingup was in 1957. I went down with Geoff Eastaugh in my old Singer la Monz. I don’t remember how long it took us, I don’t suppose the car would have gone much faster than 80 to 90 kph. When we got to Yallingup there was a reasonable wave running. Of course there was no one else there and we had no idea of where to surf. I can’t remember looking out to the outside break and if we did notice it, there was no way we were going to go out there. We both had belly boards, they were the ones that used to be hired out at Scarborough years before 1957. They were made of pine planks about half an inch thick with a slight turn up at the front and two cross pieces about ten inches from each end and were about one foot wide.

Geoff and I had flippers but no wet suits. They didn’t come in until the late 60’s. We very gamely swam out through the shore break in the bay. The shore break was pretty savage on the day. Once we got out a bit we were shitting ourselves. There are a few small nigger heads (now named ‘indigenous rocks’) out there with some long kelp on them. The kelp was waving about in the swell and we felt quite uncomfortable. I think we ended up with about three short and furious waves each before we called it a day. I have no recollection of how we got home.

I joined Trigg Island Surf Club in 1958 and started going down south with Ian Todman, Barry Brakewell and Moose White. We travelled down in my 1947 Hillman Minx. Eventually I rolled the Hillman when the approaches to the Narrows Bridge were being prepared, the car was repaired.

SURFBOARDS

From 1959 Yallingup was visited on a fairly regular basis, I must have still had the Hillman Minx. I continued surfing on various types of belly board. The most popular type of stand up board after the 16 ft toothpick was a ply Okanui board about ten feet long. Also around at that time, there were ply double and single skis. They were all hand-made and were beyond my very limited wood working skills. Occasionally someone would arrive with one of the old canvas covered stand up skis. They didn’t last long in the Yallingup surf. The people who paddle today’s stand up boards (SUPs) think they have something new, but they were around back then.

The board that really shook up the surfing scene then was when Laurie Burke arrived back in Perth with a nine or ten foot balsa board. That had everyone amazed. My first board was a balsa board made by Danny Keogh in Sydney. I can’t remember the price of the board but I remember the cost of air freight was pretty steep. I know my board arrived pre-dinged. The airlines had no idea how to carry them, there was no bubble wrap then. I must have used that board for a year or two. The trouble was that when they got dinged they soaked up water like blotting paper and became very heavy.

COOLITE SURFBOARDS

Board wise the next great thing to come along was the coolite board. I first read about them in a magazine (I don’t think surfing mags were out then!). They seemed to be the answer. They were light and would not absorb water. I duly sourced my supply of coolite and fiberglass and set too making my own board. What I lacked in ability I made up for with enthusiasm. No one told me that that fiberglass resin was a solvent, it just made the coolite disappear. Or that if you mixed epoxy resin too strong, it would catch on fire. The board turned out to be an oblong block of coolite with a sort of pointy end and a sort of rounded end with the corners rubbed off the sides and heaps of fiberglass and a funny looking fin. I remember the day I first put it in the water, I had just had stitches out from an appendix operation in the morning, so was in a bit of a hurry for the big launch. The christening was to be at Scarborough. I nonchalantly strolled across the beach with the board casually tucked under my arm. I was getting a few envious looks, boards were still very rare in those days. At the water’s edge I waxed up, took a couple of running steps leapt onto the board and it snapped in half. So ended my board building phase.

DOWN SOUTH TRIPS

All the while trips are being made to Yallingup mostly by the band of enthusiasts who all knew one another. If a car went by with a board on its rack it was one of your mates. We always camped in the trees at Yallingup. Hammocks were the preferred sleeping arraignment, baked beans and Tom Piper steak and onions a very popular menu, as were the ever reliable Jaffle. Showers and toilets were a luxury. There were toilets at Yallingup but they were very dark and were only used in absolute emergency. The mosquitoes were so bad in there you needed a blood transfusion after a visit. Placing a brick on the float valve of the cistern provided a shower for the very hardy.

In those days we generally planned our trips down south either the weekend before or during the week. Mostly we would arrange who was going with whom etc. We generally left on Friday night after work. In these early days we nearly all ways surfed at Yallingup and we would leave our boards on the beach by the old change rooms for the weekend and take them back to the cars on Sunday afternoon before we drove home.

WAFL FOOTBALL

Editor’s Note: Terry was a big strong ruckman and played with Kevin Merifield in the 1959 WAFL League Grand Final. Terry’s opponent was champion ruckman Graham ‘Polly’ Farmer. Kevin Merifield played at Full Forward on John K Watts. Unfortunately for Subi, EP won the GF. I sold newspaper at Subi oval (age 12) and watched Terry & Kevin play in the ’59 WAFL GF.

Images: 1959 SFC League team Runners-up in WAFL competition. Images courtesy of SFC and WA Newspapers.

1959 SFC League Runners-Up to EP collage_photocat

Click on this link and scroll down to year 1959 to review the 1959 WAFL Grand Final.

EARLY 1960s

OVERSEAS TRIP

In 1960 I decided that I would go overseas to the UK for a working holiday. Maybe this wasn’t the right time to do this, but we are always wiser after the event. Subiaco had played off in the Grand Final the year before and I had had a pretty good year myself. The football club weren’t too happy. I had signed on as crew on a ship in Fremantle to sail to London. This was a long time before economy airfares. Before the ship sailed for London we went down to Albany to pick up fruit on the way we went past Yallingup on a Saturday, there was a good swell running and I could actually see the blokes in the water as they went over a big wave. I thought of jumping ship and swimming ashore. I was away for twelve months and the only surf I had was a little bit in Biarritz (France) and in Hawaii.

SW SURF BREAKS

I returned early in 1961, by this time other breaks were being surfed. In particular Injidup point and bay (there was no car park then), The Gallows, Cowaramup bay and I think Margaret River. I do remember waking up one morning at Yallingup and the whole bay was closing out, the swell was huge. We went around to Bunker Bay but that was also hopeless. We went to Injidup but the whole place was closing out. We went on to Cowaramup Bay and that was big, but we thought we could get out just south of North Point. Three of us started to paddle out, myself, Ralph ‘Seagull’ Mc Nab and a young guy whose name I can’t remember. As we got out towards the middle of the bay the swell started to pick up. I could see the two blokes in front of me about thirty yards were starting to paddle hard to get over the swells. The bay was starting to close-out. I scrambled over about six huge swells but then I could see that the next one would get me, so I turned around and let it break and held on for dear life. The wave took me all the way into shore with a very rough ride and me laying down all the way.

By this time a few other blokes had come along and were looking at the guys who had been in front of me. The whole bay was closing out from point to point and about four or five hundred meters in front of the bay. ‘Seagull’ lay down and caught a broken wave, but the other lad was still heading out to sea. He ended staying out there for another half hour before he could get back in. We were very concerned for his safety and when he finally got back in he was totally exhausted and as white as a ghost.

Photo: 1962 Bob Keenan board riding, Terry Williams’s body surfing & unknown board rider at The Farm surf break, Bunker Bay. Photo credit Brian Cole.

1962 The Farm Bob Keenan surfing, Terry Williams & unknown - Brian Cole pic img272

WEST COAST BOARD CLUB

In the early days at Yallingup we generally only surfed until the sea breeze came in, usually around early afternoon. When the breeze arrived we would leave our boards on the beach and adjourn to Caves House pub for a few quiet ones. One day we were laying outside the bar in the sun, probably drunk and disorderly when the publican of the day Bill Copley called a couple of us aside and said ‘’come with me you blokes”. I thought he was going to go crook at us over something we had done, but he took us across the old bowling green to a building that turned out to be the old laundry. He said we’ve had a lot of complaints about you guys camping down on the beach and if you get yourselves organized, you can use this place as a base. We couldn’t believe our good luck. In due course a meeting was held and we decided what needed to be done to make the place liveable. The power was connected so all we really had to do was some concrete work and install a hot water system with a bit of plumbing. That was the start of the West Coast Board Club (WCBC).

Photo: 1962 Laurie Burke’s FB Holden sedan & Howard ‘The Ghost’ Kent’s Holden panel van in front of WCBC surf shack at Caves House Hotel Yallingup. Photo courtesy of Brian Cole and Surfing Down South book.

1962 Yalls WCBC shack L Burke's FB Holden & Ghost's Holden panel van - Brian Cole pic img268

The WCBC made it possible for the regular Friday night trip south. We had installed beds, gas cooking and all mod cons. The trip was usually measured by the number of ‘king browns’ and later beer cans per trip. I can’t remember all the foundation members, but some were Artie Shaw, Mark Paterson, Bob Keenan, Jim Keenan, Des Gaines, Garry Birch, Don Roper, Dave Williams, Howard (the Ghost) Kent, Kevin Merifield, Laurie Bourke, Colin Moore, Jim McKenzie & John (Dandaragan) Robinson. Apologies to those I have not named.
As first the club was very informal, but as time passed bureaucracy reared its head and we started moves to have the club incorporated. Artie Shaw was the first president, I was secretary with an assistant secretary who could type. The assistant’s name was Jeanne Abbott, she was a little Gidget from Cottesloe. We used to have meetings at the old Subiaco Footy Club rooms at Subi Oval.

After we were established a year or two we received a letter from Ampol Petroleum saying that they were sponsoring board riding championship in the eastern states and wanted to hold one here and were we interested. We were interested. The details of the organising of the inaugural 1964 State Surfing Titles escape me at this stage, except to say that we were assisted by the younger club members of the Yallingup Board Club that included Robbie Birch.

One thing that I do remember is that we erected a judge’s stand on the reef at Yallingup lagoon. Try doing that today. The event went off really well and was the precursor for all the contests that have taken place since. The party after was a terrific show with Ralph McNab doing a most spectacular swing from the rafters showing everyone his family jewels and other places we didn’t want to see. From little things big things grow.

Another event the WCBC promoted was the first Rock band to play at Yallingup Hall. Legs and I were playing footy with Wally Martin and Wally’s brother Bobby had a rock band. We hired them for a gig at the hall on a long weekend. At that time the stomp was all the rage and we had a great turnout. The band were very pleased to play there because it was the first time they had ever had their amplifiers turned up full bore.

Photo: Early 60s Terry taking a photo of L-R Howard ‘Ghost’ Kent, John McKnight, Kevin Merifield, Charlie Roper, Keith Campbell, Dave Williams & Terry Jacks at Moses Rock. Photo credit Brian Cole.

1960s Moses Terry Williams taking photo of the boys - Brian Cole img691

SW RECOLLECTIONS

I recall one year I went to Yallingup for my holidays and spent two weeks staying in the shack. After a week or so we went into Busselton to get a decent feed .There was a very good bakery there and after polishing off about six pasties I came out of the shop with a box of a dozen little cakes. All the hungry bastards around me thought they were to share, bad luck, I ate them all myself. I needed a carbohydrate binge.

The times spent at Yallingup were certainly Golden Years. I feel so fortunate to have had those times down there. The surf was great, there were no other surfers and the mates I had have been lifelong friends. Drugs were unheard of, sure we drank a bit of beer, but there was always such a great feeling of camaraderie and humour.

As I reminisce, I think of a day when Yallingup was as flat as a tack and we were having a coldie at Caves when Artie Shaw, Patto and myself decided to go and look for some surf. We drove out to Cape Naturaliste and went out past the lighthouse to what we called the ‘Back of the moon’. We had one of the best couple of hours body surfing I’ve ever had. The place is now called ‘The Other Side of The Moon’ or some other name. For sure nobody had surfed there before.

Photos: Early 60s Kevin Merifield & mates searching for waves at the ‘Back of the Moon’ at Cape Naturaliste. Photos courtesy of Terry Williams.

1960s cape naturaliste Terry Williams pics collage_photocat

I also recall when Legs, Dave Williams and I walked towards Cowaramup Bay from the Gallows and found the break we called ‘The Guillotine’.

What fantastic days.

Terry

Footnote: Terry plays the ukulele & banjo in a band. Check out his musical talents at Hillary`s Boat Harbour 5.00 pm Friday Nights.