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1968 Yallingup – Invitational Event at the State Championships

In 1964 Bernard ‘Midget’ Farrelly (NSW) won the World Mens Title at the first World Surfing Championships held at Manly Beach NSW. Midget won from Californians Mike Doyle & Joey Cabell.

Photo: 1964 Midget surfing Manly on his way to winning World Mens Surfing Title. Photo courtesy of Keith Campbell (former WASRA President).

1964 Midget Champion at Manly

In 1968 former Australian world surfing champion ‘Midget’ Farrelly was invited to WA to compete in a special Invitational Event held in conjunction with the State Championships at Yallingup on the LWE in March 1968.

The field for WA’s Invitational event included Midget, prominent WA surfer Terry Jacks, former South Australian Barry Young and representatives from most states.

Image: 1968 Midget arriving at Perth Airport for the Invitational event. Newspaper image courtesy of the Daily News.

1968 Invitational Comp Yalls - Midget Farrelly

There was a big crowd in attendance to watch Midget surf at Yallingup. He bought rounded pintail surfboards to the event and WA surfers saw the new design from the East Coast for the first time. It introduced another advance in WA surfboard design.

Photos: 1968 Yalls Midget Farrelly & spectators at the Invitational Event. Photos courtesy of Sally Jones (nee Gunter).

Top: (Left) Midget with WASRA President Ron ‘Doc’ Naylor. (Right) Midget descending steps to the beach.
Bottom: (Left) Midget heading out to surf in Invitational event. (Right) Midget returning to the beach with his rounded pintail surfboard.

1968 Yalls Midget Farrelly invitational Event Sally Jones collage_photocat

The invitational event was held in sunny offshore conditions at Yallingup. Midge rode the lefts in his smooth controlled style. Terry Jacks was frothing and went for it. At the conclusion of the event many spectators thought Terry had won the event, but Midge’s name was already engraved on the trophy and that was that!

Some of Terry’s supporters kicked up a bit of dust, but it was in vain.

Images: 1968 Midget Farrelly at the Invitational event. Still frame images courtesy of City Beach Surf Riders Super 8 movie film.

1968 Yalls Invitational event Midget Farrelly collage_photocat

Image: 1968 Terry Jacks surfing in the Invitational event. Newspaper image courtesy of the Daily News.

1968 Invitational Comp Yalls - Terry Jacks1

COMMENTS ON INVITATIONAL EVENT

Peter ‘Spook’ BothwellMidget had just got back from Hawaii and was full of stories about Joey Cabell and his pintails.

Barry ‘Baz’ YoungBesides me, for the Invitational, another surfer from interstate was Alex Chobinoff (NSW) who had been here for 6 months roughly like myself. I placed third in that Invitational as well as coming 2nd to Spook in the State Titles. It was pretty small that day and I gambled and surfed the ‘Bunbury Break’, which was named because of the crew of Bunbury surfers who surfed it more than most. It’s now known as “The Cove”. Whilst Midget and the other 4 competitors hassled each other at Main Break I got a little lucky where I was.

When Midget arrived for the contest and pulled 4 Pintails out of his car we were all flabbergasted. The Press on what was happening design wise over East was very limited and I’m pretty sure no one had heard about boards that had pointed tails. It seemed weird to have a tail shape that looked the same as the nose. There was a lot of disbelief and almost jeering as he walked past the big crowds lining the steps and beach with one of these strange designs under his arm on the way to the water. I think he thought about not staying for the Invitational, but the WASRA contest directors talked him around and tuned a few crew to keep their opinions to themselves for the rest of the weekend.

I have been surfing in the Maldives twice now in recent years, at the same time as Midget and his wife, and he still surfs pretty good for age 71.

Photo: 2015 Former WA Surfboard Manufacturer Tom Blaxell with 1964 World Surfing Champ Midget Farrelly in the Maldives. Photo courtesy of Tom Blaxell.

2015 Maldives Tom Blaxell and Midget farrelly at Pasta Point

In 2001 Surfing WA made a presentation to Midget Farrelly at Yallingup Beach.

Photos: (Left) 2001 montage presentation to Midget at Yalls designed by Quindalup’s Loz Smith. (Right) 2006 Midget & Loz Smith at Jack Egan photo exhibition held at Vasse Felix Winery.

2001 & 2006 Midget Farrelly & Loz Smith images collage_photocat

1968 STATE SURFING CHAMPIONSHIPS HELD AT YALLINGUP.

The state championships were held in good offshore conditions at Yallingup over the March long weekend. Members of most WA Board Clubs competed in the Titles. Finalists in the divisions went onto represent WA at the National Surfing Titles held in NSW in May 1968.

Editor’s NoteA month after the State Titles finalist Arty Sherburn nearly died when he was stung by a blue bottle jellyfish while surfing at Cottesloe. He was unable to take his place in the WA State Team and compete in the ’68 National Titles in NSW.

Images: (Left) 1968 Cover of WASRA program. (Right) Preview of State Titles at Yalls. Images courtesy of WASRA & the Daily News.

1968 State Surfing Titles Yalls media 2 collage_photocat

Images: 1968 State Surfing Titles at Yalls. Images courtesy of the Daily News & Trevor Burslem.
(Left) Media preview of the WA Titles. (Right) Jim King competing in Open Division.

1968 State Ttiles Yalls Jim King 3 collage_photocat

CONTEST RESULTS

Peter ‘Spook’ Bothwell (age 19 years) from Sand n Sea board club won the Open Mens. Competing in 6ft surf Spook beat former South Australian Barry Young and Arty Sherburn the Southern Surfriders champion. Surprisingly, John Balgarnie & 1966 champion John Staley were eliminated in the semi-finals.

Ian Cairns from Southern Surfriders was the outstanding junior surfer & won the Junior Title from Phil Taylor & Ian ‘Moochie‘ Strongman.

Dave Williams won the Senior Title.

Maureen Farrell won the Womens Title.

Images: 1968 State Surfing Titles at Yalls.
(Left) Media review of the WA Titles courtesy of WA Newspapers.
(Right) Contest spectators & judges scaffolding on the beach. Photo Jim King.

1968 State Titles Yalls 4 collage_photocat

COMMENTS ON STATE SURFING TITLES

Peter ‘Spook’ BothwellThe 67 titles were when I thought I could win and was surfing at my peak. I didn’t get out of my heat, John Staley went on to win. In 68 I was over it (the competitive hype) and more relaxed. I thought John Staley was surfing good enough to win in 68, but he got over anxious like I did in 67 and was knocked out. My other memory was that everyone who surfed went in it. A bit like a festival.

I next went into a state contest in 76, after not surfing much for a few years and the crowd and competitive crew numbered about fifty. The atmosphere had changed, still seriously competitive, but the wider social interest went for a time.

Barry ‘Baz’ YoungIt was borderline whether I was eligible to compete in the main event (State Titles) because you had to have been living in WA for 6 months and I got Arty Sherburn and John Staley to say I had been here that long, but I think I was about a week short.

I had been called up for National Service and came to the West to surf as much as possible before going in. I ended up doing my Draft medical in Bunbury, and swallowed silver foil in the hope it would show up as a spot on my lung (it had worked in the Big Wednesday movie) but they never remarked on it. What they did notice was my very large surf bumps on my feet. I had gone to the medical in suede Desert Boots, which were the rage at the time and they asked me if I could wear leather boots, and I said I doubt it, so they got me to try a pair on, and I faked pain enough that they didn’t sign me up….relief! We had been losing about 3 or 4 soldiers a day in different skirmishes in Vietnam and I didn’t want to be part of it. I remember I hitched back to Yallingup and went out and had just the best surf. A big weight had been lifted from my shoulders.

SOCIAL

With a big LWE crowd in attendance it was not surprising that some anti-social behaviour occurred at Caves House pub on the Saturday Night.

Image: 1968 Media report on an alleged brawl at Caves House pub. Newspaper cutting courtesy of the daily News.

1968 Caves House Yalls pub brawl

A fun long weekend surfing & socialising in the South West was had by all.

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1960s-70s West Coast Surfboards

In the late 60s & 70s West Coast Surfboards in Fitzgerald St West Perth was run by surfboard craftsman Bob Gairdner and partners Mick Dalziel & Eddie Warner.

West Coast Surfboards attracted a stable of fine surfers in Peter ‘Spook’ Bothwell (dual State Open Champion), Ian Cairns (dual World Champion), Barry Day (Duke Kahanamoku Trophy winner) and Craig Howe (NW surfing pioneer).

Photo: 1973 West Coast Surfboards showrooms in West Perth. Photographer unknown.

1973 West Coast surf shop - unknown A

Photos: Vintage West Coast Surfboards (Left) 1969 surfboard logo & (Right) 1970 single fin surfboard. Photos courtesy of Phil Woods Collection.

1969-70 West Coast Surfboards Phil Woods Collection IMG_001

Bob Gairdner shaped all of ‘Spook’ Bothwell’s West Coast surfboards.

’Spook’ Bothwell: “My introduction to Bob Gairdner was through David Beamish with whom I was friendly with. It was after I won the 68 State Title on my John Arnold which Malcolm Loch organised for me, that Beamish introduced me. Bob made me a board to ride in the Australian Titles, in Sydney. The board was based on Midget’s pintail which I rode when he was at Yallingup in 68.
Bob Gairdner made every board I rode for years. Terry Jacks also rode them. Mick Dalziel who was an original Southern Surfrider was also a partner and an influential design collaborator.
Other surfers who surfed the Coasters were Al Fixter, Neil Peacock and Dave Plaisted to name a few.
The thing about Bob was he was interested in the process, the surfers themselves, surfboard design and everyone respected him for it.
Northbridge was a different place back then”.

Photo: 1972 ‘Spook’ Bothwell surfing a West Coast side slipper shaped by Bob Gairdner at the back of Cowaramup Bay in the SW. Photo credit Ric Chan.

1972 Moses Peter Spook Bothwell on West Coast side slipper - R Chan img530

West Coast’s surfboard construction team was comprised of master shaper Bob Gairdner, Eddie Warner (Cottesloe) glasser/sander. In 1972 Barry Day (City Beach) glassed, sanded & polished boards. State Surfing Champion Ian Cairns (Cottesloe) also shaped some boards for West Coast in the 70s.

Barry Day: “In 72 Ian Cairns shaped me a slide slipper surfboard based on his own blue coloured Midget Farrelly slide slipping surfboard. It was a wonderful board and we had a lot of fun together“

Photo: 1972 Barry Day at Yallingup with his Ian Cairn’s shaped slide slipper board with platypus nose and red colour design. Rod Slater is crouching next to Barry. Photo credit Ric Chan.

1972 Yalls State Titles Barry Day & Rod Slater - Ric Chan img095

Barry Day rode an Ian Cairn’s shaped West Coast Surfboards 6’2” area rounded pin with twin fins when he won the Duke Kahanamoku Trophy at the 1972 Australian Titles held on NSW beaches.

Photo: 1972 Barry Day’s Duke Kahanamoku trophy back home at Yalls. Photo credit Bruce King.

1972 OZ Titles NSW Duke Kahamoku Trophy B Day CBSR IMG_8308

Photo: 1973 surfer Craig Howe & Bob Gairdner inside the West Coast factory. Photo courtesy of Craig Howe.

1973 Craig Howe & Bob Gairdner West Coast Surfboards - Craig Howe A

Ian Cairns rode a West Coast Surfboard to victory in the 73 Smirnoff World Pro-Am Surfing Championships (de facto professional World Championship) held at Laniakea in Hawaii.

Barry Day: “Either Bob or Ian shaped Ian’s blood red coloured board and I glassed and sanded it”.

In 1974 Ian Cairns shaped Barry Day a 6’8” x 19.5” single fin swallow tail board at West Coast Surfboards.

Barry Day: “I made the fin, glassed, sanded, gloss coated, polished and then waxed & surfed the board”.

Photos: 1974 Barry’s West Coast swallow tail surfboard shaped by Kanga. Photos courtesy of Jim King.

1974 West Coast Surfboard by Ian Cairns collage_photocat

Image: 1974 Barry Day footballer/surfer working at West Coast Surfboards. Image courtesy of The Daily News.

1974 Barry Day - profile ex Daily News A

Photo: 2010 Old boys reunion at Marybrook function. L-R Loz Smith, Barry Day & Bob Gairdner. Photo courtesy of Loz Smith.

2010 Loz, Baz & Brian Gairdner West Coast Surfboards Busso Loz picA

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Loz Smith’s recollections of 1985 Yallingup Malibu Surf Classic

The annual Yallingup Malibu Surf Classic (Yal Mal) has been running continuously for 30 years.

SW surf identity Laurance ‘Loz’ Smith and some of his surfing mates created and run the first contest in 1985.

These are Loz’s recollections of the inaugural event held at Yallingup Beach in 1985.

I thought up the idea of a gathering of SW friends to celebrate the long board revival and as a tribute to my SW longboard friend John ‘John Boy’ Malloy. Tom Hoye had shaped a Malibu board for John Boy and I enjoyed watching him surf Yallingup and Injidup Car Park.
Peter ‘Mac’ McDonald, Greg ‘Pants’ Laurenson & I met at Bob & Jenny Monkman’s place in Dunsborough for dinner on a Thursday and we talked about the contest and prizes.
I then designed contest posters and a t-shirt and collected contest prizes. I paid Mick Button $350 to make a Santosha longboard to present to the winner. ‘Pants’ (GL Surfboards) shaped a fibreglass version of a mal to scale to present as a perpetual trophy to winners. Pat Leahy (Wetsuits) donated a wettie and Baz Young (Ripcurl) donated 6 pairs of board shorts as prizes.

Photo: 2015 Quindalup Loz Smith with the original Surf Classic t-shirt. Photo credit Loz Smith.

2015 Loz Smith holding original 1985 Yal Mal t-shirt - Loz Smith pic IMGP7116a

The Contest was promoted by poster and word of mouth. The initial contest was postponed when it was discovered it clashed with a couple getting married. It was changed to accommodate the wedding and we missed perfect waves on that occasion.

Legendary NSW surfer Jim Banks) was surfing The Bluff at the time. He got sick and I drove back to Cronulla in NSW with him. I stayed a couple of months with Jim in NSW and there was concern about the future of the contest. But John Boy had spread the word amongst SW & city surfers and it was still on. Then John Boy had to return to home in USA and I took over promotion again.

Unfortunately the surf for the rescheduled contest (after wedding cancellation) was onshore & only 1/2 foot. It was postponed to a later date at a meeting held at Surfside on the Saturday morning.

On the third attempt 100 surfers gathered at Yalls on the Saturday to find atrocious conditions and it was cancelled for the day.
That night a dance was held at Yallingup Hall with music provided by Gina Pannone and Vance & Nance Burrow. The dance finished at midnight and Terry Jacks helped clean up the hall. I crashed 2am at Rob Malcolm’s place on Yallingup hill.

I was woken up approx 6am by Craig Brent-White. The morning was hazy and the ocean & horizon blended into each other. We went down to the beach to ascertain conditions. The swell was a clean 8-10ft & wind offshore. There was a large gathering at the beach. Many crew headed to the public toilets to ease the tension on their tummy…..it was seriously big!

Tony ‘Harbo’ Harbison confirmed the contest was on. But no one was keen to go out for first heat.

I wanted the contest to be a success and recoup my expenditure on contest t-shirts. So I grabbed my Jacko single fin longboard souvenired from the Yallingup tip and tied 2 extra rail savers onto my Pipeline leg rope. I entered the ocean near Grannies Pool and paddled wide out into the bay to get in the line-up. Not being a big wave surfer my balls and heart were in a race to get to my throat. After what seemed like an eternity I got out the back to take a rest. I was so far out I had a view of Caves House gardens. After some time I paddled into a smaller swell, my rubbish tip found Jacko surfboard with rolled rails to the tail, refused to hold into the left-hander & I fell down the face with the whole lip going over my head. It was the worst wipe-out I can recall. I retrieved my board and while paddling back out to attempt another wave, to my absolute joy, I witnessed the First Heat descending down the steps at Yalls. I caught another wave with the express intention of getting in.

I cheered the boys as they paddled out. At the top of the steps the judges were at the ready. Harbo told me I was in the next heat.
After regathering my courage, I followed Harbo across the reef for the second heat. I followed him thinking he knew Yalls better than me. We launched off the reef into a maelstrom of white water near The Bubble. Unfortunately I was hit by a mountain of white water and my board struck my funny bone and I lost feeling in my arm. Still managing to follow Harbo, I eventually got out the back and caught a left, I came straight in.

The day went on. Ian ‘Lips’ Mitchell snapped Pat Leahy’s brand new Town & Country mal in half. He got caught inside on the biggest wave of the day, a 10-12ft monster.

Craig ‘Clarrie’ Brent-White snapped Greg Laurenson’s brand new 9’1” hand shaped long board. Craig bought in part of the board and the rest floated out to sea.

Photo: 2014 Quindalup. Craig Brent-White on his 66th birthday with the remnants of Greg Laurenson’s long board snapped at the 85 contest.

2015 Craig Brent-White holding 1985 Yal Mal GL broken mal - Loz Smith pic IMGP7117a

John ‘Headstand’ Clemenger made the final and took out the event after borrowing Dan Darrigan’s 10’6” GL custom single fin longboard. John took off on a 5ft left and did a headstand before returning to his feet and finishing the wave. Conditions turned on-shore during the finals.

Judging was different in this contest. The result was split between the judges and the crowd’s choice. It was a unanimous decision and John ‘Headstand’ Clemenger was judged the winner.

Photo: 1985 Surf Classic finalists: L-R Bob Monkman, Robbo, John Clemenger (kneeling with board), Peter Mac, Ian ‘Mitch’ Mitchell, Peter Dyson, Ross Tomsett (the big black dog belonged to Ross & was called Cindy or Bear), Cliff Hills, Gene Hall, Tony Harbison, Keith Campbell & Kevin ‘Twiggy’ Sharland. Photo credit Loz Smith

1985 Yal Mal4 finalists

Afterwards contest presentations were held on the beach. There were many prizes and Robbo won the worst wipe-out award. Later there were festivities and recollections of fear factors at Caves House. While I do have some photos of spectators on the beach, unfortunately I have no photos of contest surfing at the event.

Photo: 1985 Surf Classic presentations on the beach. Brian Cole, Harbo and Cliff Hills can be seen at the back on left. Photo credit Loz Smith.

1985 Yal Mal beach presentation Brian Cole, Harbo, Cliff Hills - Loz Smith pic IMG_02a

Photo: 1985 Surf Classic spectators. L-R Brian Sherrington and Wayne ‘Choco’ Cartledge sitting on wall. Photo credit Loz Smith.

1985 Yal Mal spectators Brian Sherington & Wayne 'Choco' Cartlidge - Loz Smith pic IMG_03a

Photo: 2014 Yallingup Surf Classic presentations at Caves House. Contest winner Justin Redman with the GL perpetual trophy. Photo credit Loz Smith.

2014 Yal Mal Justin Redman - Loz pic IMGP7600a

The 2015 Yallingup Malibu Classic will be contested this coming weekend December 5-6, 2015. Put it on your social calendar!

 

 

 

 

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Peter Dyson & The Banned

In the mid 60s Peter Dyson was a member of the Yallingup Board Club and the lead singer in popular Perth band ‘The Banned’.

‘The Banned’ formed in 65/66 and played at Perth’s top night clubs including Pinocchio’s, Top of Town, Whisky a Go Go and the Top Hat in Northbridge.

Peter was the proud owner of a VW Kombi van. He used the van for surfing and transporting the band to gigs. There were times when the band practiced in the van in the back streets of Dalkeith.

In the following photo, Peter is using a home-made wooden step ladder to access Malibu surfboards on the roof rack of his van.

Photo: Mid 60s Dyso’s Kombi at Rocky Point. L-R John ‘Blue’ Burridge, Peter Dyson (on step ladder), Kevin Ager, Mick Maddren, John Balgarnie & Charlie Roper. John ‘Ned’ Franetovich is sitting on the boards. Photo courtesy of Peter Dyson.

mid 60s Rocky Pt John Burridge, Peter Dyson, Kevin Ager, Mick Maddren, John Balgarnie. Roo Dog, Ned F on roof. PD pic IMG_23

Peter was a talented surfer and finished 2nd to Mike Bibby in the 66 WA Winter Championships held at Scarborough.

Photo: 1966 Scarborough finalists WA Winter Championships L-R Maureen Farrell, John Pozzi, Mike Bibby, John Balgarnie, Peter Dyson, Terry Jacks & Eleanor Proud. Photo credit Trevor Burslem.

1966 Scarborough WA Winter Champs - T Burslem pic

In the 70s Peter served as a WASRA official along side President Tony Harbison and vice President Ken Trainer..

Photo: 1978 WASRA Surfing Awards presentation. L-R Peter Dyson, Ken Trainer & Mike McAuliffe. Photo credit Ric Chan.

1978 WASRA Surfing Awards P Dyson, Ken Trainer & M McAuliffe - Ric Chan 025

In the 80s Peter was involved in the entertainment business in Bali. Peter with his Balinese business partner known colloquially as ‘The King of Kuta’, ran the popular Casablanca, Peanuts & Manhattan night clubs in Kuta Bali. They held the first disco license in Bali and were very successful.

Photo: 1985 Bali. Peter Dyson outside the Casablanca Night Club in Kuta with Kath King & Fran Fimmano. Photo credit Jim King.

1985 Bali Kuta Casablanca Nightclub Peter Dyson. Kath King & Fran Fimmano - Jim KIng pic

In 1994 Peter Dyson was seconded into the Surfside Surf Team to compete in the annual Yallingup Malibu Surf Classic.  The boys were entertaining but did not win the Teams Challenge event.

Photo: 1994 Surfside Teamriders L-R Peter Mac, John ‘Tex’ Branch, Loz Smith and Peter Dyson enjoying Yal Mal Presentations at Caves House. Photo courtesy of Loz Smith.

1994 Yal Mal Surfside Team Riders Mac, Tex Branch, Loz & Peter Dyson. Loz pic DSC_1077

In 2014 Peter Dyson attended the Surfing Down South book launch held at Vasse Felix Winery in the SW.

Photo: 2014 Surfing Down South book launch. L-R Jim King, Kevin Merifield, Kevin Ager, Jim ‘Lik’ McKenzie, Peter Dyson & Ray Nelmes. Photo credit Loz Smith.

2014 SDS Book Launch IMGP3937 L-R Jim King, Kevin Merifield, Kevin Ager, Jim 'Lik' McKenzie, Peter Dyson & Ray Nelmes

 

 

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Surfside at Yallingup – Recollections

Many SW residents and visiting surfers enjoyed the hospitality at Surfside Tea Rooms/Store/Cafe/Restaurant/Accommodation at Yallingup over the years. This is a collection of their Surfside recollections from the 50s to 80s.

Jim Keenan – pioneer WA surfer

Surfside tea rooms were run by the Hammond family and was a favourite amongst the 50’s & 60’s surfing fraternity for hamburgers upon arrival and breakfast whenever the rain washed out our fires.

The Hammonds were very generous with their tucker and would stay open until our arrival from the city on a Friday night, for a weekend of surfing.

We would arrive rugged up in our great coats (winter) or bear suits half pissed from the journey down from Perth. The honest guys would order hamburgers which of course required action in the kitchen a separate room.

The dis-honest took advantage of this and filled their pockets with blocks of old gold chocolate while the counter staff were preparing the hamburgers in the kitchen. I won’t mention the main culprits name but, his initials were T.H.

I guess T.H. survived because he did share the wares when we returned to our hammocks on the rock face facing Yalls. We felt guilty but, the benefits outweighed the problem.

I have met with Garth Hammond and discussed the above and he assures me that his parents were well aware of the Fagan in our midst, but chose not to complain. Wonderful people and karma will care for T.H.

The tearooms were also the venue for the tourists arriving via a state run bus. They would flood into the rooms and buy their tea and cream covered scones. If the boys happened to visit in the same time frame, I can only imagine what they thought of the strangely dressed patrons talking in what sounded like a foreign language.

Photo: 1962 Jim Keenan & Puppydog surfing outside Gallows on Barry Bennett surfboards from NSW. Photo courtesy Jim Keenan.

1962 Gallows outside break J Keenan & Puppydog on NSW Barry Bennet boards - J Keenan pic

Peter ‘Mac’ McDonald – Yallingup

In the late 60s when we travelled down south on weekends and the weather was poor, we would sleep in the public brick toilets or on Surfside’s side verandah. Later when we were working in the SW carting hay about 10 of us (George Simpson, Ronny Ratshit, Grant Robinson, Gary Kontoolas & others) used to sleep in our cars under the melaleucas. We had breakfast (tomato mince) & dinner with Bernie & Eve at Surfside.

Bernie must have felt sorry for us sleeping in our cars and offered the back toilet/shower block to George Simpson, Rick Lobe & I. We moved in to our plush accommodation.

When the hay job finished we went off picking spuds for the Smith family near Carbunup.

Photo: Early 1970s Moore River L-R Steve ‘Blue’ Nicholson, Peter McDonald, Jenny Limb & Micko Gracie – Photo courtesy of Peter Mac.

Early 1970s Moore River Mac, Blue, Jenny & Micko - Peter Mac pic IMG_05

Steve Carr – Yallingup

This is my best recollection of the fate of George Simpson’s old Ford Customline which was abandoned outside Surfside Yalls probably around 1970/71 (or thereabouts).

The car was parked out the front of Surfside for ages and we (along with a few others) used it to sleep in if we had too many for our own car.

Bernie had had enough of it sitting out the front and asked a few of us if we could get rid of it. I can’t remember how many of us there were involved in the disposal but it was a few, probably 5 or 6 at least. One of the guys that was down there a fair bit in those days was Ian Reid who lived on a dairy farm in Capel and he had a HR Holden that was probably the newest and best car of all the locals down there at the time.

Back then there would have only been no more than a dozen houses in the bay (if that) so we decided to tow it up the hill to the top of Wardanup Crescent and push it off the road into the bush. It did take a fair bit of effort to get it up the hill and I have a recollection that “Ronnie Ratshit” was sitting on the bonnet of the old bomb as Ian was towing it but I think we had to do a bit of pushing as well. Unfortunately poor Ian finished up burning his clutch out in the process of getting it up the hill so it become an expensive exercise for him!

Needless to say Bernie was happy that the car was gone and on the other side of ledger I suspect the poor bugger who eventually bought the block had the additional cost of getting rid of the old bomb from the area before they were able to start building.

Photo: 1974 Sydney NSW Steve Carr & some party animals. Photo courtesy of Steve Carr.

70s Steve Carr & party animals1

Bruce King – Dunsborough

On stormy nights we used to sleep in the toilet block behind Surfside then wake up to a Bernie and Eve breakfast special of savoury mince on toast.

We also stayed at the Lurch house next door and quite often had card nights and séances which were downright scary at times. We communicated with the so called Yallingup ghost (he used to frequent the local area supposedly carry his head under his arm). The then president of WASRA Dr Ron Naylor was present on some occasions and could not explain the phenomena. After one session we predicted a lone swimmer who left from Cottesloe for a swim to Rottnest was apparently attacked and we would find his skull at a beach north of Perth. Trevor Burslem who was working with 6PR radio station at the time heard of this and followed it up. A skull was subsequently found on a northern beach and we gave away séances after that.

Photo: 1973 Bruce King at Three Bears. Photo courtesy of Bruce King.

1973 Bears Bruce King South West 008

Louie ‘Longboard’ Corkill – Dunsborough

In the early 70s I used to mow lawns for Harbo and Pete Dyson to earn money for food at Surfside. Pete Dyson used to pay me out of an army sock with rolled up $20 notes.

Back then Andy Jones used to be a cook at Dunsborough Bakery. In winter time I used to pinch uncut loaves of warm bread off the hot rack, hollow them out and stick my feet in them to keep warm. Mark “Murf the surf” Brescoe and I used to sleep in the hedge next to the Dunno bakery.

I felt my first women’s tits under Tom Hoye’s Board Shop next to Surfside. I fondled the girl’s breasts while her mother was above us listening to Neil Diamond’s “Hot August Night’.

Photo: 1975 Louie Corkill (age 16) at Mandurah with Len Dubben surfboard & Adler boardies. Photo courtesy of Louie Corkill.

1975 Louie Corkill age 16 Mandurah Len Dibben surfboard & Adler boardies DSC_8670a

Russell Quinlivan – Busselton.

Here is a story, printable or not. It was a cold and wintery night, 1972 inside Surfside, with myself, Paul Galbraith, Charlie Dingbat, George Simpson and this drunk guy who owned the 2 holiday units next to Surfside. George and the drunk guy were playing pool for money as we watched on. This drunk dude kept trying to antagonize George after each of his losses, but George ignored it, as he was taking this guy’s money. After his 4th loss in a row, this guy started to verbally abuse George, and even poked George heavily in the chest. George remained calm. Then this guy did the unthinkable, he slapped George across the face. “Oh No,” we thought. George, thought for a second or so. There were 3 heavy laminex tables and chairs between the pool table and the front door, which parted like the Red Sea as George upper cut this guy to the front door, casually opened it and pushed him out. George must have had a lot of brownie points with Bernie, as Bernie never said boo about the mess that we all commenced to clean up. Hope you like my story. Sorry no Bloody photos. Ha.

Photo: 1970s Russell Quinlivan at Trigg Point. Photo courtesy of Peta Quinlivan.

70s Russell Quinlivan Trigg Point - Peta Quinlivan IMG_01

Laurie ‘Loz’ Smith – Quindalup surfer & photographer

In 73-74 my brother Tony & I would sleep in his split screen Kombi in the Yallingup car park. At that time there were no rangers and camping was free. After an early surf, we used to have a brekkie of sausages & eggs on toast and a cuppa at Surfside for 60c. We would play table soccer for 10c a game while we were waiting for brekkie. We used to fill up the Kombi at Surfside using the hand pump Petrol Bowser. Surfside was the only place to eat brekkie besides the Bakery at Dunsborough. Sally Jones used to work at the Bakery and made the biggest milkshakes. If Tony & I surfed elsewhere, we camped in the Kombi at Injidup, Rocky Point or under the melaleucas near the creek at Cowtown.

Photo: 1980s Yallingup Yal Mal contest. L-R Tim Eastwood, Peter Mac & Loz Smith. Tim & Loz are holding Rob Malcolm’s 8 footers. Peter Mac’s is holding a 9ft Cordingley board shaped by Bob Monkman. Photo credit Peter Mac.

1980s Early Yal Mal unknown, Mac & Loz - Peter Mac pic IMG_01

Mal Leckie – Queensland surfer & artist

I remember one funny morning at Surfside. When you ordered your meal you got a numbered ticket and then Eve would appear at the little side door-window thing and call out the number when it was ready. We all sat waiting and talking at the tables.

Eve came to the window and yelled out “99” but nobody came forward, so she put the meal aside and served a couple of others. Then she tried again with “99” a couple of times but nobody showed up. Then she got a bit edgy and yelled out a very loud “Ninety-bloody-nine” but still nobody responded as she stood there holding the plate and looking at the ticket. Everyone was quiet now as the mystery evolved and we were all waiting to see who it was that was going to cop a mouthful from Eve. But as she stood there with plate and ticket, she suddenly got a sheepish look on her face, then very quietly said, “oh, Number 66”.

The place erupted with belly laughs. I’m sure whoever had 66 will remember that, it was a classic.

Photo: 1973 Nedlands Mal Leckie & Tony Hart. Photo credit Faye Hart.

1973 Nedlands Mal Leckie & Tony Hart - Faye Hart pic

Al Bean – Surfboard Shaper Dunsborough

In the early 70s I shaped surfboards for Gary Greirson in Osborne Park. Then I convinced Gaz to let me shape boards down south. In 1975 I moved down south and shaped 10 boards per week at an Ellenbrook Road rental property. I converted an old lean-to on the side of the house into a shaping bay. I surfed and shaped 2 boards per day & drove boards back to the city on a Friday night, socialised over weekend & then drove back to SW with surfboards blanks on a Sunday night.

Late in 77 my dad told me his accountant had a syndicate that had bought a caravan park and store in the SW and they wanted me to manage it for them. When I found out it was at Yallingup I was rapt. I became Manager of Surfside & the Yalls Beach Caravan Park on 20 Dec 1977 at age 20 years. I learnt to cook and employed local girls to help at Surfside.

Back then city surfers would sleep in cars in the car park and we would get up to 60 surfers waiting for breakfast each morning over the weekend. It was a different story during the week and we would be lucky to sell a choc milk & newspaper to Harbo at Hideaway Homes. So I would close the shop mid-week and go surfing. On a Wednesday I would play country darts at Caves House with all the House boys (local family).

Young Mark ‘Hillzee’ Hills used to cash soft drink bottles at the shop and then sneak around the back and pinch them to re-sell again (-:

I did a bit of grass slashing at the Caravan Park, but not much else. Leon Thomasian used to live in the Caravan Park and would hide in the long grass to avoid paying camping fees.

I managed Surfside and the Beach Caravan Park until 1979.

Photo: 1974 Al Bean (age 19) with Grierson Surfboard at South Point. Photo credit Ric Chan

1974 Sth Pt Al Bean - Ric Chan DSC00021

Leon Thomasian – Dunsborough

In the late 70s, I lived in Al Bean’s unkempt Caravan Park on Yallingup beach. The park was covered in double-gees and would puncture thongs. I was worked as a lighthouse keeper at Cape Naturaliste, Cape Leeuwin and Cape Leveque in the NW before heading over east.

In the 80s young Dane & Scotty Richardson lived in the Beach Caravan Park with their dad. The Richardson boys were like terrorists and got up to all types of mischief with Mark Hills.

Photo: 1978 Leon Thomasian at Meelup Valeey. Photo credit Vance Burrow.

1978 SW Leon Thomasian Meelup Valley cropped VB IMG

Mark ‘Hillsy’ Hills – Quindalup

Biggest memories for me at Surfside as kids were the pinball machines. It was 20 cents a game and to get money to play we used to go through the bins and look for cool drink bottles which you could cash in for 8 cents at Surfside. Would have been around 1978/79 and I was about 12 or thirteen. Tony and Coral Harbison owned Hide Away Holiday homes where we would stay through the holidays and down the side of their home they would stack cool drink bottles in crates left by guests . This was a treasure trove for the pinball machines. Me and Pete Felton thought it would be a good idea to knock off this treasure trove and cash it in a Surfside. We got busted by Harbo and being pretty bloody fair he offered us half the profit if we took the cool drink bottles over to Surfside instead of just taking them. This worked a treat as we also noticed that it was very easy to access where Surfside stacked their bottles. So we would carry Harbo’s bottles over, half the profit, then later take back our bottles from Surfside and cash them back in again. We played a lot of pinball .

Photo: 1990 Mark Hills surfing Rabbits on Mitch Thorson’s Campbell Bros Bonza surfboard. Photo Credit Kevin ‘Twiggy’ Sharland.

1990 Rabbits Mark Hills on Mitch Thorsons Campbell Bros bonza board - Twiggy Sharland pic

Refer to Surfing Down South book for Garth Hammond’s & George Simpson’s Surfside recollections.