Gallery

1950s Toothpicks, Okanuis and Malibus

In the early 50s WA surfers used hollow plywood 16ft Toothpick and 10ft Okanui surfboards to surf metro waves.

Surfboard designs changed in 1956, when a visiting American surf team put on a surfing display in conjunction with the Olympic Games held in Melbourne. The American boys (including famous big wave surfer Greg Noll) impressed Aussie on-lookers at Vic and NSW beaches on their light weight balsa Malibu boards.

WA surfers then started importing balsa boards from NSW manufacturers while others made balsa boards in their backyards.

In the late 50s surfboard innovators Brian Cole and Barry ‘Joe’ King made themselves 9ft triple stringer surfboards out of coolite foam glassed with epoxy resin.

This is a collection of 1950s surfboard images with comments from SW surf pioneers Terry Williams and Brian Cole.

Terry ‘Horse’ Williams:From 1958 Yallingup was visited on a fairly regular basis, I must have still had the Hillman Minx. I continued surfing on various types of belly board. The most popular type of stand up board after the 16 ft toothpick was a ply Okanui board about ten feet long. Also around at that time, there were ply double (Jim Keenan & Cocko Killen) and single skis. They were all hand-made and were beyond my very limited wood working skills. Occasionally someone would arrive with one of the old canvas covered stand up skis. They didn’t last long in the Yallingup surf. The people who paddle today’s stand up boards (SUPs) think they have something new, but they were around back then”.

PLYWOOD TOOTHPICK SURFBOARDS

Photos: 1950s Ron Drage & Dave Williams with Toothpick surfboards at City Beach. John Budge pics.

Photo: 1954 Ray Geary with his Jasper design surfboard at City Beach. Ray Geary pic.

Photos: 1955 Ray Geary & Rob Wakefield with Toothpick surfboards. Ray Geary pics

Left: Rob Wakefield & Ray Geary with Rob’s new 16’6” board.

Right: Rob with old 13’ and new 16’6” board.

Photo: Mid 1950s City of Perth clubbies Ron Drage, Dave Williams, Cocko Killen and E Mickle with plywood Toothpick paddle board at City Beach. John Budge pic.

Photo: 1956 Tony Harbison with broken toothpick board at Yallingup. Brian Cole pic

Note: old Yallingup timber change rooms in the background.

Photo: 1956 Ray Geary’s homemade four man surf ski at City Beach. Ray Geary pic.

L-R Ray Geary (19), Neil Chapple (17), Rob Wakefield (18) & Colin Taylor (17).

Photo: 1958 Dave Williams with toothpick surfboards at Miami Beach near Mandurah. John Budge pic.

Photo: 1958 Peter Docherty (age 13) with his 12ft plywood surf board at City Beach. Peter Docherty pic.

PLYWOOD OKANUI SURFBOARDS

The following material on Okanui surfboards was sourced from History of Okanui Surfboards in Australia by Bill Wallace published in Pacific Long Boarder Magazine 3 April 2012.

In the early 1950s world renowned surfing industry legend Bill Wallace was making four Toothpicks a week as well as wooden skis for clubbies throughout Sydney. During this period Bill and his mates where known to surf 20-foot waves off Bronte, Bondi and fairy bower on 16′ to 20′ toothpicks. The toothpicks weighed around 30KG – this would be thought of as ludicrous to the big wave surfers of today as the toothpicks had no fins!

In 1956 Greg Noll and other surfers from the USA brought the Balsa Malibu to Australia, when Bill and others saw the board in the water they couldn’t believe how a board could ride across the wave and turn so easily. Bill set out to replicate that board, but at that time you could not buy Balsa wood in Australia. So he made it like the toothpicks from the ’40s – hollow in the middle and chambered with Marine Ply. These boards would be known as the “Okanui.”

Bill Wallace:Most people think the Okanui was a Hawaiian word, but I think Bluey Mayes came up with it. ‘Oka’ Meaning Aussie and ‘Nui’ meaning new, the new Aussie surfboard!”

Photo: 2012 NSW Bill Wallace with a 1957-58 Wallace 9’6” Okanui surfboard. This hollow board is made out of Marine ply and has Hope Pine and Surian Cedar rails. It is the last Okanui made by Bill Wallace.

Jim ‘Lik’ MacKenzie: I bought my first Malibu style board from an older Scarborough Surf Club member at age 13. Due to the lack of Balsa wood from WW11, the board was made of marine ply and was hollow inside with ribs like a boat. It also had a bunghole in the nose to drain any water out. It was the Australian marine ply version of the USA balsa Malibu surfboard and was called an Okanui.

My son Sol collects vintage surfboards. He located and purchased my original Okanui surfboard for his collection…see pics below.

Photos: 1958 Jim ‘Lik’ MacKenzie’s original 10ft marine plywood Okanui surfboard. Jim MacKenzie pics.

BALSA MALIBU SURFBOARDS

Terry ‘Horse’ Williams: “The board that really shook up the surfing scene then was when Laurie Burke arrived back in Perth with a nine or ten foot balsa Malibu board. That had everyone amazed. My first board was a balsa board made by Danny Keogh in Sydney. I can’t remember the price of the board but I remember the cost of air freight was pretty steep. I know my board arrived pre-dinged. The airlines had no idea how to carry them, there was no bubble wrap then. I must have used that board for a year or two. The trouble was that when they got dinged they soaked up water like blotting paper and became very heavy”.

Photos: 1957 Bernie Huddle with his homemade balsa board at Yallingup. John Budge pic.

Brian Cole:Light weight Balsa surfboards were introduced to WA in the late 50s to replace the heavy plywood toothpicks surfboards. The boards were light weight but the balsa sucked water in if the fibreglass coating was damaged.

Most of the balsa boards were imported from eastern states surfboard manufacturers Gordon Woods, Bill Wallace & Bill Clymer. Pioneer NSW surfboard manufacturer Joe Larkin did his apprenticeship with boat builder Bill Clymer. Bill Clymer had a one man surf boat at Manly. He would row out into the waves and use the sweep oar to steer back to the beach.

Some of the balsa boards were homemade in back yards from balsa blanks purchased from Boans Department store in Perth city.

The balsa was purchased in lengths 9ft x 4” square. Then they were glued & clamped together prior to shaping with electric & hand planners. A spoke shave was used to take shave off rough edges of the timber. Resin & fibreglass cloth was purchased from Monsanto in Subiaco. The shaped balsa was glassed with a single coat of 10 ounce glass…it was difficult to wrap the glass around rails! A filler coat was added, but no gloss coat. Fins were made out of plywood & glassed with a bead on the edge. The fin was glassed onto the board.”

Photo: 1957 Dave Williams with his monogrammed balsa board at Yallingup. John Budge pic.

Photo: 1958 Bob Keenan (on pogo stick) shaping a balsa board in his backyard surfboard studio at Subiaco. The balsa blank was purchased from Boans Department store. Photo credit Bob Keenan.

Photo: 1958 homemade balsa surfboards at Yallingup. John Budge pics

L-R John Budge & Don Bancroft.

Photos: 1950s Balsa surfboards.

Left: 1957 Bruce ‘Moonshine’ Hill with balsa board at Miami Beach near Mandurah. John Budge pic.

Right: 1959 Brian Cole with balsa pig board at Coolangatta in Qld. Brian Cole pic.

Photo: 1959 surf pioneers with balsa surfboards at Mettams near Trigg Beach. John Budge pic

L-R Colin Taylor, Dave Williams, Cocko Killen, Bruce ‘Moonshine’ Hill & Artie Taylor.

EPOXY SURFBOARDS

In the late 1950s WA surf pioneers Barry ‘Joe’ King and Brian Cole rode homemade 9ft triple stringer polystyrene (Coolite) surfboards glassed with epoxy resin.

Photo: 1958 Barry ‘Joe’ King with his homemade three stringer epoxy surfboard at Yallingup. John Budge.

Brian Cole’s homemade 9ft three stringer epoxy board can be seen in the following photo. (Brian is second from left).

Photo: 1959 a quiver of epoxy, Okanui, and Malibu surfboards at Yallingup. Brian Cole pic.

L-R Ray Nelmes, Brian Cole, Jim Keenan, Des Gaines, Laurie Burke, John Budge & Artie Taylor.

Coming soon 1960s Surfboard Designs

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Gallery

Rod Slater living down south in 1967 – Updated 29 April 2017.

Correction 29 April 2017: Rod Slater was born and bred at Triggs and went to Scarborough High because that was the closest high school.

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Scarborough surfer Rod Slater and his surfing mates Buttsy and Choko shifted down south in 1967.

These are Rod’s SW memories and photos.

I finished 5th Year at Scarborough Senior High School in 1966 and in the autumn of 1967 shifted down south with David ‘Buttsy’ Purcell from Watermans and ‘Choko’ (not sure of his real name) from either City Beach or Cottesloe (I think).

We rented a few rooms at the back of an old house in Busselton. The only work we could get was picking up sticks and cleaning paddocks.

We had some good uncrowded waves with the likes of John Balgarnie, Terry James and Alan McGilvray.

When we couldn’t afford to live in the South West any longer, we went back to Perth in early 1968. Back in the big smoke I laboured to raise funds to go surfing over East.

I have included a few photos from our brief attempt to live down south.

Rod Slater

Photo: 1967 David ‘Buttsy’ Purcell at the back of the rental house in Busselton. Rod Slater pic.

Photo: 1967 the boys on Yallingup Beach with surf boards #1. Rod Slater pic.

Photo: 1967 the boys on Yallingup Beach with surf boards #2. Rod Slater pic.

Photo: 1967 Buttsy with Choko and his Vee-Dub sedan in Yallingup Beach car park. Surfside Store holiday accommodation units are in the background. Rod Slater pic.

Photo: 1967 Buttsy and John Balgarnie in Yallingup Beach car park. The historic Hammond cottages are in the background. Rod Slater pic.

Photo: 1967 Buttsy and SW surfing pioneer Terry ‘Rat’ James in Yallingup Beach car park. An undeveloped Valley Road is in the background. Rod Slater pic.

In mid-1968 Rod got on a train in Perth and headed over to the East Coast chasing waves.

Coming soon Rod Slater’s memories of surf trips to Phillip Island in Vic.

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Gallery

1970s Surfside memoirs by Angie Cannon (nee Young)

In the late 60s Bernie and Eve Young took over management of Surfside Tearooms at Yallingup from Jock Henderson. The Young’s previously managed the Caves Park Store near Caves House at Yallingup. They provided hearty meals, holiday accommodation and petrol to surfers, tourists and the Yallingup community until the mid 70s, when the Surfside leased expired and they moved on.

Bernie and Eve lived and worked on the premises with their daughter Angie and Gran.

Photo: 1970 Bernie Young with daughter Angie, Gran, wife Eve and unidentified outside Surfside Tearooms. Photo credit Peter McDonald.

Bernie Young’s daughter Angie Cannon (nee Young) has contacted Surfing Down South and shared her memories of Surfside.

Angie:I was fortunate enough to spend my early teenage years in Yallingup and my parents Bernie and Eve Young would have fed most of you at Surfside in the late 60’s and early 70’s. My fondest memories are of my extended family, always looking out for me painful as I could be sometimes. George Simpson was my surrogate big brother and used to, on occasion, let me tag along generally to carry his board to some of the greatest surf spots on the coast. My daughter Sarah now sends me this info as it comes through and it always brings back memories, including the SDS Blogs on Three Bears. I remember when the boys found the break and for a while it was MGM. It was right up there with discovering gold in the pub and the stories only grew in proportion to the amount of beer consumed at the Caves House. It was the hidden secret that few could reach. Lost a lot of humour when I returned in later years with my kids and a 4WD. I have lots of pictures taken in those early years, most are of parties we had at Surfside and some, I feel sure, would rather be forgotten!! I’ll dig out some of my photos and scan them for you (see pics below).

I now live in Townsville in Queensland and both Mum and Dad have passed on, Mum at a ripe old age of 91 only four months back”.

Photos: 1971 Peter Mac’s Falcon panel van parked in front of Surfside. Photo credit Helen ‘Spotty’ Smith.

Angie:Your SDS articles have stirred up so many memories and stories, I only wish that I had had the opportunity to share them with Mum before she passed on.

If you are still in touch with Ronnie “Ratshit” Jeffrey, ask him about the “tomato” plant he left in my Grans care whilst he went to, Indonesia, I think. My Gran would make homemade wine out of anything animal or vegetable and as inevitably would happen once a month there would be an explosion from her bedroom that meant a bottle had slightly over fermented.  Gran probably holds dibs for the first wine maker of the region!!  I went to help with the clean-up mission only to find Ronnie’s “tomato” plant flourishing in her wardrobe.  Bless her she had no idea, but tended it lovingly for Ronnie until he returned.

Gran would sit on the back steps of the kitchen peeling spuds faster than anyone alive.  Hans Kopp finally retired her for a more sanitary mode of spud bashing in the kitchen of the Cray Pot.

Hans did the best Crayfish Thermidor in the world as we knew it.  Brandy was his friend in the kitchen. 

Hans was an enigma, a soft and gentle man who would turn into some kind of manic chef as soon as he donned his whites.  Many a waitress was bought to tears from one of his legendary tirades in the kitchen.  He wasn’t adverse to the occasional upending of a pot or the throwing of a knife.  I was 14 and copped my fare share.  He would wake up the next morning, go for a surf and get on with his day as if nothing happened. 

My folks did a great job at Surfside and their trusting nature bought them unstuck eventually.  My Dad very much believed in the honour of the handshake, and unfortunately having put in years of hard work at Surfside, he was bought undone as the lease was sold out from under him.  He established the caravan park and worked tirelessly, doing battle with the council, hand sewing grass seed, digging trenches and overseeing the work as it became a reality.  As with all things, it was time to move on.  Mum and Dad only went back a couple of times and were always amazed at the changes.  Dad often spoke of being offered 3 blocks on the top road by Kevin Merifield for $800 each.  Dad was no fool, why would he buy something with no water or services for that sort of money!!!   

They both spoke of their time in Yallingup with great humour and love.  The old man could be a bit of a lunatic, but he was an incredibly hard worker and meant well.  Mum worked tirelessly in the kitchen from six in the morning till late at night in the tourist season.  She would share a grill with George, which meant walking around the immoveable object, serving good basic food for a never ending stream of hungry surfers.

All of this whilst being ostracised by the then civilised locals who were sure that we were a family of drug barons living and mixing with the great unwashed, long haired dole bludgers of the 70’s. They even had a mention in the Melbourne Truth once, with questionable comments as to their REAL motives for being involved with those bludgers on society. The truth be known, they were incredibly naïve and just enjoyed the lifestyle and peace that Yallingup bought to them for 8 months of the year.

Thanks for the memories. Please keep the stories coming”.

This is a collection of Angie’s Surfside social images from her scrapbook.

Angie: “the images are a little worse for wear after all those years!”.

Image: 1971 Eve Young, unidentified and Helen ‘Spotty’ Smith outside Surfside . Image courtesy of Angie Cannon (nee Young).

Image: 1970s Vicki Jago working in the Surfside kitchen. Image courtesy of Angie Cannon (nee Young).

Image: 1970s Sam the surf dog on the rocks. Image courtesy of Angie Cannon (nee Young).

Image: 1970s George Simpson and others at the back of Surfside. Image courtesy of Angie Cannon (nee Young).

Image: 1970s George Simpson in kids play pen entertaining Gran at Surfside. Image courtesy of Angie Cannon (nee Young).

Angie: ‘Enough said!”

Image: 1970s Safety conscience trio enjoying a smoke near the fuel pump outside Surfside. L-R unidentified, George Simpson and Glynn Lance. Image courtesy of Angie Cannon (nee Young).

Angie: “Always safety aware!”

Image: 1971 Bruce King and unidentified girl at Surfside party. Image courtesy of Angie Cannon (nee Young).

Image: 1971 George Simpson’s 21st party at Surfside’s Lobster Pot Restaurant. L-R Barry Day, Amber, Lulu & Spotty. Image courtesy of Angie Cannon (nee Young).

Image: 1973 Sally Gunter’s 21st Birthday Party at Surfside’s Lobster Pot Restaurant. L-R Grant Robinson, George Simpson & Bernie Young. Image courtesy of Angie Cannon (nee Young).

Image: 1976 Angie’s wedding in Perth. Image courtesy of Angie Cannon (nee Young).

Angie: The Yallingup crew came up to Perth for the occasion.  It was the last time we were all together!”

Angie: “It’s quite bazaar as I can’t imagine anyone or anything changing but its 40 odd years ago!!!  An old photo of ‘Jingles’ (a long haired surfie dude) made me smile. When he left Yallingup and returned to the East Coast, he gave me a bell that I wore around my neck until I got married, mum made me take it off as it didn’t go with my dress.  It’s been on my key ring ever since.

Oddest thing about Yallingup, I’ve never quite felt at home since I left and I have lived all over Australia.   Many years ago I bought a block on the 2nd road down in the middle of the hill.  Sold it in the 1980 for $16k thought I’d done really well.  Makes me a property genius huh!”

Thank you for sharing your photos and memories Angie.

Click on the following web links for more history of Surfside.

Surfside at Yallingup – History (Part 1 The early years)

Surfside at Yallingup – History (Part 2 The later years)

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Gallery

1970-80 Yallingup Beach car park

Update: 20 March 2017. According to Wardandi Elder George Webb’s book ‘Noonyabooghera’, Yallingup means ‘place of land falling away‘ referring to the limestone cliffs. The ‘place of love‘ myth was created by the people that opened up the caves and Caves House as a honeymoon destination. Source Melia Brent-White.

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Yallingup Beach car park has been a meeting place for surfers since the mid-50s.

The Wardandi aboriginal meaning of Yallingup is ‘Place of Love’. In 2011 a large bronze sculpture of a surfer was erected at Yallingup to recognise its role in ‘the origins of surfing in WA’.

Photos: 2011 unveiling of surf pioneer sculpture at Yallingup. Jim King pics.

2011 Yalls surf pioneer statue Jim King picscollage_photocat

Surfers used to camp under the melaleuca trees at the beach car park in the ’50s. Then in the 60-70s surfers used the old public toilets as overnight accommodation in inclement weather.

Things have certainly changed since those days, camping is now banned on the beach front, the public toilets have been relocated and the car park curbed & landscaped. Today’s surfers meet in the car park to check the waves & ‘chew the fat’ on surfing, footy, women……and more recently ailments issues.

This is a collection of car park images with a sprinkling of comments from surfers who frequented the Yallingup car park & Surfside Store back then, when times seemed so much simpler.

Photo: 1970 State Open Champion Tony Hardy in the car park at Yallingup. Ric Chan pic.

1970 Yalls State Titles Tony Hardy - Ric Chan img192

Peter ‘Mac’ McDonaldIn the 70s when we were working in the SW carting hay, about 10 of us (George Simpson, Ronny Ratshit, Grant Robinson, Gary Kontoolas, John Molloy & others) slept in our cars under the melaleucas at Yallingup and ate breakfast (tomato mince) & dinner with Bernie & Eve at Surfside.

Photo: 1970 Steve ‘Sheepdog’ Cockburn behind & in front of the camera in Ric Chan’s Kombi at Yallingup. Ric Chan pic.

1970 Yalls Steve Cockburn in Ric's kombi- Ric Chan img202

Peter Dunn (NZ expatriate) Yallingup regular John ‘Tex’ Branch arranged my first trip down south in 1972. Tex met my mates & I at the Cottesloe pub and we then headed to Yallingup in a convoy.

Photos: 1972 First trip Down South. Peter Dunn pics.

Left: Yallingup car park team photo. L-R Peachy, Paul, Renya, Murray, Tex, Keith, Wayne, Dick, Steve & Bow.

Right: Busselton pit stop. Bearded ‘Tex’ sitting on the roof of Prive’s former Holden panel van.

1972-yalls-car-park-peter-dunn-pics-1a-fotorcreated

Len DibbenThis Photo was taken by my wife Wendy in the Yallingup car park at the Australian Surf riding Championships, about July 1973. I was part of the Contest committee to run the 1973 Australia Surfboard Championships. At that time, I was Vice President to Ron Naylor president. I organized the Kombi to help run Contestants & Reporters to & from venues, if needed. The two children are my daughter Kim at 7 year of age & son Troy at 5 years of age. They are now aged 48 & 46. The gear I am wearing is a Baron wear striped t-shirt…very popular at that time, Levi Jeans & John Arnold Hararchi Leather Sandals from then Adelaide.

Photo: 1973 Aust Surf riding Championships contest official Len Dibben in the car park at Yallingup. Wendy Dibben pic.

1973 Aust Titles yalls contest marshal Len Dibben with daughter Kim 6 & son Troy 4

Laurie ‘Loz’ Smith (Quindalup surfer & photographer) – In 73-74 my brother Tony & I would sleep in his split screen Kombi in the Yallingup car park. At that time there were no rangers and camping was free. After an early surf, we used to have a brekkie of sausages & eggs on toast and a cuppa at Surfside for 60c. We would play table soccer for 10c a game while we were waiting for brekkie. We used to fill up the Kombi at Surfside using the hand pump Petrol Bowser. Surfside was the only place to eat brekkie besides the Bakery at Dunsborough. Sally Jones (nee Gunter) used to work at the Bakery and made the biggest milkshakes.

Photo: 1973 Yalls Lobster Pot Restaurant at Surfside. L-R Grant Robinson, George Simpson and Bernie Young at Sally Gunter’s 21st birthday party. Sally Gunter pic.

Photo: 1975 Yallingup car park during State Surfing Titles. Surfside Store is on the left and the old brick Toilets are under the melaleucas on the right. Ric Chan pic.

1975 Yalls State Titles Yalls car park img097 (6)

Andy JonesWe used to kick the footy in Yallingup car park. It was an open area with few cars and was a good meeting place for surfers. Before technology (surf reports/web sites etc) we used to check waves conditions from the car park before heading off to the best surf destination for the day.

Photo: 1975 Mark Favell ex Bundaberg Qsld & Andy Jones in Yalls car park. Gina Pannone pic.

1975 Yalls Mark Favell ex Bundaberg Qsld & Andy Jones - Gina Pannone pic_0004

Julie FavellAndy Jones, Mark Favell, Neil Juster and myself all lived in Dunsborough. We all work in the Dunsborough Bakery. It was a hell of a time. We travelled to Bears along the old road following coast. One vehicle we had was an old VW with balloon tyres. We always made it through the dirt track. Neil had a blue heeler dog (sorry forgotten his name), Neil was always tying him up and that darn dog always got himself out, could climb ladders at a great pace. At this time there was a surfboard maker at Willyabrup Peter ‘Stumpy’ Wallace who made Pegasus Surfboards. And the beginnings of Creatures of Leisure leg ropes at Injidup by Helen & Dave Hattrick and John Malloy.

Photo: 1975 Yallingup Mark Favell & Southey the dog in front of old brick toilet block. Julie Favell pic

Bruce KingIn inclement weather we used to sleep in the old toilet block behind Surfside tea rooms/store. I never had a sleeping bag and used to sleep in thongs in keep warm as my feet used to stick out the end of the blanket.

Photo: 1976 unidentified surfers in Yallingup car park. Ric Chan pic.

1976 Yalls car park unknown - Ric Chan 006

Al Bean (Surfboard shaper) – I became Manager of Surfside & the Yalls Beach Caravan Park in 1977 at age 20 years. I learnt to cook and employed local girls to help at Surfside. Back then city surfers would sleep in cars in the car park and we would get up to 60 surfers waiting for breakfast each morning over the weekend. It was a different story during the week and we would be lucky to sell a choc milk & newspaper to Harbo at Hideaway Homes. So I would close the shop mid-week and go surfing.

Photo: 1978 an empty Yallingup car park with Surfside Store, Bali Hai surf shop & Surfside rental accommodation in the background. Vance Burrow pic.

1978 Yalls Bali Hai surf shop Yalls VB IMG

Ross UttingIt was always difficult to fill in long hot surf-less afternoons, particularly on holiday or contest weekends when there were a lot of high spirited people about. Fortunately there were a few blokes who fancied themselves as stunt drivers. These blokes would relieve our boredom by putting on a display of burning rubber and wheelies in the Yallingup car park.

On one occasion, two of these charismatic drivers in Bill “Big Eyes” McVeigh and Kevin “Odey” O’Dwyer fed off each other, with each stunt becoming more outrageous than the one before.  They ended up, each in turn, racing down the hill from the pub at high speed, over the bridge and throwing the wheel on full lock entering the unsealed car park, sliding and spinning wildly through the car park and coming to a halt in a cloud of dust in front of the cheering masses, leaping out of their cars and taking a bow.

Both brilliant drivers, but how none of the vehicles parked in the car park were not damaged or pedestrians killed still amazes me.  The owner of Surfside Tea Rooms with it’s petrol bowser out front wouldn’t have been amused either.

Photo: 1980 Parking spot with a view. Gary Gibbon’s Ford Cortina with protruding surfboard in Yallingup car park. Gary Gibbon pic.

1980 Yalls car park Gary Gibbon's Cortina - Gary Gibbon pic IMG_0018

Louie ‘Longboard’ CorkillI left school at age 13 and started hitchhiking down south. I used to camp in the old toilet block at Yallingup beach. I slept in a board bag made of quilt by my mother. The best camping spot used to be in the melaleucas just before the bridge on the right, as you come down the hill into Yalls. Brian Bell and I would set up our tent or sleep in the car next to the fresh water creek which flowed from the pub.

Photo: 1980 Ray Nott & Dave Seward preparing to go for a surf at Yallingup. Gary Gibbon pic.

1980 Yalls car park Ray Nott & Dave Seward - Gary Gibbon pic IMG_0025

Mal Leckie – Steve “Horny” Campbell used to do an interesting performance for tourist buses in the Yall’s car park when he pulled his boardies up as high as they would go, puff his stomach out like he was pregnant and do an emu walk. 

More than one dead snake arrived at speed into the Yall’s car park behind a car, tied to the back by fishing line and “whipped” into the entry area to Surfside.

Photo: 1981 Steve ‘Horny’ Campbell and hound installing electricity at Caves Caravan Park. Gary Gibbon pic.

Floyd IrvineIn the early 80s my mates and I used to pitch our tent on the lawn in front of the ugly old brick toilets at Yallingup. We had a friendly council ranger who would provide firewood for our camp fire and chat with us. Back then nobody gave a shit what you did!

Photo: 1980 Tony Harbison reading West Coast Surfer magazine at Yallingup car park. Tony and his wife Carol built and ran Hideaway Holiday Homes at Yallingup in the 70s. Ric Chan pic.

1980 Yalls Tony Harbison with West Coast Surfer mag - Ric Chan 065

Photo: 1980 surfboard shaper Greg Laurenson and Dave Kennedy from Star Surfboards in Yallingup car park. Sadly the surf industry legends are now deceased. Ric Chan pic.

1980 Yalls G Laurenson & D Kennedy - Ric Chan 069

Photo: 1980 Greg Laurenson, Dave Kennedy, Tony Harbinson and Mitch Thorson in Yallingup car park with Harbo’s dog Prince. Ric Chan pic.

1980 Yalls Harbo, Greg Laurenson, Dave Kennedy etc- Ric Chan 072

Yallingup Beach car park is still a meeting place for surfers in the South West.

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Gallery

1963 “The Midget” goes Hawaiian…and wins World Title

Cottage restoration

Local craftsmen are restoring Peter and Robin Bothwell’s historic Hammond cottage on the hill at Yallingup.

The architect is the Bothwell’s daughter Lucie.

Craftsmen include Steve Russo, Rich Myers, Bevan Carr, Loz Smith & his son Jimmy.

Loz:You can’t build memories into a new house, so Spook kept the old one”.

Photos: Dec 2016 restoration work on the Bothwell cottage at Yallingup. Peter Bothwell and Loz Smith on site. Jim King pics

Discovery of historic article

The craftsmen renovating the Bothwell cottage found a 1963 Australian Women’s Weekly magazine under the old linoleum flooring.

The magazine dated March 6 1963, includes an article on former World Surfing Champion Bernard ‘Midget’ Farrelly from NSW.

The article written by Kerry Yates appears in the magazine’s Teenager’s Weekly supplement.

The header reads….

“The Midget” goes Hawaiian…and wins World Title

Bernard Farrelly, the 18 year old Sydney boy who recently won the International Surfboard Riding Championships in Hawaii, became a film star at the same time.

Image: 1963 article on Midget Farrelly, courtesy of Australian Women’s Weekly & Kerry Yates.

Sadly the first world surfing champion Midget Farrelly passed away August 6, 2016 age 71.

Many thanks to Loz Smith for providing this historic material.

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